Embedded Systems Conference
Breaking News
Blog

IPv4, IPv6, The Internet of Things, 6LoWPAN, and lots of other “Stuff”

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
jinlu8591
User Rank
Rookie
Ipv6 and 6LoWPan
jinlu8591   4/3/2015 9:39:49 PM
NO RATINGS
On the surface, 6LoWPan is based on IPv6, so it should be interoperable with IPv6, the future internet protocol.  If you look under the hood, however, it is not really the case.  In 6LoWPan, the IPv6 header is compressed, and a lot of "optimization" is done to the IPv6 packets, so that you need a gateway to "translate" between the noncompressed/nonoptimized IPv6 and the 6LoWPan worlds.  The fact that you need to have a gateway in between put it in the camp of other Iot protocols.  That kind of defeats the purpose of using IPv6 as the starting point.  The only thing special about it is that it has an IPv6 address (128bit address), but so what - you still have to do translation to uncompress the address, etc. You might as well map the internet address to something else since you have to some work there anyway.  The point is that  6LoWPan is not truly interoperable with IPv6!

VincentChen
User Rank
Author
re: IPv4, IPv6, The Internet of Things, 6LoWPAN, and lots of other “Stuff”
VincentChen   2/3/2013 7:01:35 AM
NO RATINGS
Great article, thanks! With the today's wi-fi device, is there any way to connect to the wi-fi network by itself when it is first brought into the network? Would the new Wi-Fi DIRECT standard help? Saw the Belkin WeMo product, I am wondering how it get linked to the home wireless network. Any idea?

RoweBots1
User Rank
Author
re: IPv4, IPv6, The Internet of Things, 6LoWPAN, and lots of other “Stuff”
RoweBots1   9/13/2011 5:10:14 AM
NO RATINGS
The BT stack (blueZ for the most part) provides a full network stack implementation including profiles. The equivalent of this would not be 802.15.4 - think of this more like the MAC/Phy layer. 6loWPAN is built on top of the 802.15.4 radio to provide packet compression and routing in the network (ROLL/RPL - experimental). The IPv6 network driver talks to the 6loWPAN implementation. What does this mean for Android? It really means you need a dynamically installed 6loWPAN driver with 802.15.4 hardware and you are there.

RoweBots1
User Rank
Author
re: IPv4, IPv6, The Internet of Things, 6LoWPAN, and lots of other “Stuff”
RoweBots1   9/13/2011 5:05:03 AM
NO RATINGS
BTW, we have a 6loWPAN implementation with IPv6, as well.

RoweBots1
User Rank
Author
re: IPv4, IPv6, The Internet of Things, 6LoWPAN, and lots of other “Stuff”
RoweBots1   9/13/2011 5:03:02 AM
NO RATINGS
I think that the conclusions of this article are based on some erroneous assumptions. The most glaring example is that there is absolutely no reason you cannot download a new image and reflash it using any wireless network that has appropriate protocols. 6loWPAN supports this sufficiently. Why do we need an interpreter? It is an option and may be cool but other approaches work as well. Interpreters are inefficient and not so secure. By the time that all the security is added you have Java which requires 1M -3MB of memory to be practical. I think a range of solutions will be provided for some time.

Doktor Phil
User Rank
Author
re: IPv4, IPv6, The Internet of Things, 6LoWPAN, and lots of other “Stuff”
Doktor Phil   8/5/2011 10:40:07 AM
NO RATINGS
Another company that has a combined SNAP and 6LoWPAN stack is NXP, through their acquisition last year of Jennic. They call it Jennet-IP and they announced recently it will be open-sourced. You might also want to check out: http://www.jennic.com/products/protocol_stacks/jennet-ip

MartinFree2move
User Rank
Author
re: IPv4, IPv6, The Internet of Things, 6LoWPAN, and lots of other “Stuff”
MartinFree2move   7/26/2011 7:44:31 AM
NO RATINGS
More important than addressing length is security; in particular in the Internet of Things which often lacks human intervention and a cloned device with bad intentions can cause serious issues. As everyone knows both IP addresses and MAC addresses do not meet the uniqueness criterion as they can be modified. If we compare with RFID, most tags (and even readers) have their unique ID in hardware guaranteed by the vendor or by a 3rd party and cloning (with the exception of some older standards) is extremely difficult. In NFC, the optional secure element provides the same security. How can we guarantee that one node is not assigned the same IPv6 address as another node? In the IPv4+MAC world, this is not possible. Therefore nodes will need a third ID which also will need to be unique. Unless there is a technology as well as a trusted third party to guarantee the uniqueness of IPv6 addresses, and making them untamperable, IPv6 will be limited to very few non-critical applications.

Rickerr
User Rank
Author
re: IPv4, IPv6, The Internet of Things, 6LoWPAN, and lots of other “Stuff”
Rickerr   7/22/2011 11:30:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Forgive my ignorance Max, but do the existing android phones simply need a new compilation to communicate over 802.15.4 as they can already communicate via Bluetooth (802.14.3)?

Horaira
User Rank
Author
re: IPv4, IPv6, The Internet of Things, 6LoWPAN, and lots of other “Stuff”
Horaira   7/14/2011 7:28:38 AM
NO RATINGS
Great Article

Sokwoo Rhee
User Rank
Author
re: IPv4, IPv6, The Internet of Things, 6LoWPAN, and lots of other “Stuff”
Sokwoo Rhee   7/13/2011 9:18:25 PM
NO RATINGS
Great article. I think Android@Home has a great potential, but the Google's move also raised many issues and questions. The following article may be of interest. http://blog.millennialnet.com/2011/07/13/where-is-google-going-with-the-android-home-initiative/

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Most Recent Comments
Susan Rambo
 
MFahmy0
 
cd2012
 
junko.yoshida
 
MikeD95101
 
betajet
 
junko.yoshida
 
Bill_Higdon
 
Tom_C
Flash Poll
April 2015 Cartoon Caption Contest: The Mighty Hamster
April 2015 Cartoon Caption Contest: The Mighty Hamster
Of all the exhibits in the Pre-Apocalypse Era Museum, Breek was always in awe of the unearthed details and true-to-scale reproduction of a technological creation space that the long gone humans had once inhabited.
149 comments
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed