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Flat versus hierarchical PCB design – which is best?

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7/22/2011 07:03 PM EDT

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MHK_#1
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re: Flat versus hierarchical PCB design – which is best?
MHK_#1   7/31/2011 7:17:14 PM
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Hierarchical PCB Design, even in a RTL design, is the inevitable way of doing it in these days. As System is getting larger in every new chip/revision, it is practically x10, if not x10000000, beyond of schedule all logic entity can be captured in one sheet of paper (or one screen) In RTL design, I use instance of those module, IP and others, as usual. In PCB, I’d like to symbol in very where and OrCAD helped me to Zoon in Zoom out very well. As you are with Cadence, I am sure you already knew about OrCAD, as a basic start. OrCAD serves me very well for many years of the hier design on PCB.

vikaskohli
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re: Flat versus hierarchical PCB design – which is best?
vikaskohli   7/29/2011 5:48:16 AM
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Hi Kendall Thanks for your response. When you state "allowing hierarchical schematics to be printed out using a large sheet size top layer that interconnects them readably" do you mean generate a top level page instantiating all blocks in the design and show signals flowing to them? Vikas

shahHR
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re: Flat versus hierarchical PCB design – which is best?
shahHR   7/28/2011 5:50:33 PM
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John, How have you dealt with issues from the downstream consumers of the schematics - PCB designers, test engineers, ...?

John K.
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re: Flat versus hierarchical PCB design – which is best?
John K.   7/28/2011 5:33:56 PM
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Gee, I have been using a hierachical method my whole career. Even in the days of paper and pencil.

kendallcp
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re: Flat versus hierarchical PCB design – which is best?
kendallcp   7/25/2011 11:24:32 PM
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A significant source of complaint against hierarchical schematics comes from test and service engineers. Even today, there's still a preference for large-scale paper schematics across which signals can be traced. Modern CAD tools, within which the design engineer produces the final circuit diagram directly, provide many tools to reduce error within the design. But producing human-readable schematics, rather than machine-readable netlists, gets rather neglected. Cadence and other CAD suppliers could help by allowing hierarchical schematics to be printed out using a large sheet size top layer that interconnects them readably (yet correctly). It will save hours of work with a glue stick!

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