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Micriuim gives it away...

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RoweBots1
User Rank
Freelancer
re: Micriuim gives it away...
RoweBots1   8/18/2011 3:40:01 AM
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While Micrium wants big bucks for commercial use of its software, RoweBots Unison v4 is available for commercial use for free. It is fully commercial, tested to POSIX standards, is Linux compatible and offers a complete operating system with I/O unlike other offerings. A file system, serial I/O and I/O model with sockets interface is available absolutely free. Additional TCP/IPv4, documentation, tools and source code can take the price up to $3299, but it is still the best commercial offering available for low volume. Unison v5 is the latest version with pricing for a base kernel and USB under $4999 with complete documentation and source code. This is less than 1/3 of the reported cost of Micrium ucosIII. Go figure ...

Code Monkey
User Rank
Rookie
re: Micriuim gives it away...
Code Monkey   8/16/2011 5:23:48 PM
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I think this is great PR. The Open Source movement showed that companies will respect licenses even though the source is freely obtainable. Embedded products have a long lifetime. Any company (including large Chinese ones) won't want to have such a long exposure window to the legal ramifications of not licensing. Ten (or more) years is a long time to hope that the Chinese government won't bust you.

rallysjd
User Rank
Rookie
re: Micriuim gives it away...
rallysjd   8/15/2011 2:10:20 PM
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I looked at Micrium when developing my current embedded USB project. The software is robust and easy to merge with other code, and the GUI part would have been very useful. However, the licensing costs for the project were in the $16-20K range depending on what was chosen, though for this I could build as many units as I liked of a product design. Micrium is targetting established OEMs who intend to build thousands of inexpensive units or hundreds of costly ones, and there's nothing wrong with that of course. Any OEM who is building a small quantity (like me) can't justify the $16-20K up front, and look at FreeRTOS and Linux/Android as the viable options. If Micrium were to offer an affordable license model for small volume USA/Canada OEMs, I'd consider them again. We would not need tech support. There is an issue with administration and verification that the $20K licence avoids, but copyright laws are enforcable in USA/Canada, much less so in China. I also think that Android will take many of the (re)designs that uCOS-II-III (and others) would have handled.

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