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Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)

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Anqu
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re: Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)
Anqu   8/26/2011 6:51:44 AM
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Thanks for reply, Seems to be easy but on the receiving side how can we again convert that bytes (data between start of frame FFD8 and end of frame FFD9 ) in to an image again. can you elaborate on that. so that i can display it on the PC or GLCD. one ore thing i want to know data bytes received will be a continuous stream how can we know that it is for R or G or B.

Steve Bible
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re: Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)
Steve Bible   8/26/2011 5:45:59 AM
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Hi Anqu, yes you can. There are cameras that take jpeg pictures and communicate with a microcontroller via a UART. If you treat the photo as bits, then you can transmit the photo wirelessly. You will want to pay attention to your photo size in kilo bytes, and your transmission speed in bytes per second, to know how long it will take to transfer one photo. Good luck!

Anqu
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re: Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)
Anqu   8/25/2011 6:55:23 AM
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HI Steve....i m new to image caputering techniques. It will be very kind if you can help me out. i m trying to capture an image from camera and then send it by wireless network with the help of microcontroller and then at the receiver end convert that data back in to the image... i was searching for the related help material and came to know that there are UART ready cameras for interfacing with controller, iwas wondering if can use them or not? or if u have any suggestions for me...i really want to get this done.....

Steve Bible
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re: Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)
Steve Bible   8/21/2011 5:03:45 PM
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+28V is the voltage coming from the Silver-Zinc Battery. This is the same battery used in the Russian Orlan space suit. It's the battery that we were given for the project and this set the battery/solar panel buss voltage. From the +28V the PSU regulates it down to +12V for the cameras, +8V for the RF, and +5V for much of the circuitry. The expected lifetime of the satellite is 3-6 months. It is in a very low-Earth ordit that will decay and the satellite will re-enter the atmosphere and burn up.

prabhakar_deosthali
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re: Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)
prabhakar_deosthali   8/21/2011 7:09:13 AM
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The voltage rating of 28V looks something odd to me. Which ICs require such a kind of voltage?. I have seen 12V, 24V 48V battery systems. Any specific reason for choosing 28V. Does the PSU also generate 28V DC? Just curious. Also what is mission of this satellite and what is the expected lifespan?

Steve Bible
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re: Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)
Steve Bible   8/19/2011 3:23:51 PM
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Hi braddock, for everyone's benefit, Fox is AMSAT's next satellite. See http://www.amsat.org/amsat-new/fox/. To answer the question, we will use parts of ARISSat-1 as we can. The main design challenge for Fox is its small size and smaller power budget.

braddock
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re: Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)
braddock   8/19/2011 2:11:33 AM
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Are the boards in the stack CubeSat-compatible? What parts of ARISSat might be used in Fox?

LoopTek
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re: Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)
LoopTek   8/19/2011 2:08:47 AM
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Thanks Dixy3 that was very interesting. I learn something new every day !!!!! I never knew that this type of battery was used in anything other than watches and such... But it doesn't sound like I will be incorporating it into any of my projects anytime soon... unless they end up going to into space :) Thanks Jon KG6VDW

Steve Bible
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re: Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)
Steve Bible   8/18/2011 11:25:41 PM
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Hi Chris, Looking at the MC13260, it appears to be a single channel device. When designing a satellite you have many users. You wish to support as many as you can. This is why a transponder is most attractive. Another issue is doppler. You would like to have wider bandwidth to aid in capturing the signal.

Steve Bible
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re: Chips in Space: Letís look inside ARISSat-1 (part 1)
Steve Bible   8/18/2011 6:56:34 PM
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Hi Jon, the simple answer is it was the battery given to us by RSC Energia. I explaing a little more in the next blog post, and as Dixy3 mentioned, please read AA2TX's article.

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