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What do we do about the space junk?

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NATRON
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re: What do we do about the space junk?
NATRON   8/18/2011 8:26:23 PM
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AEROGEL...LOTS OF IT...

sparking1
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re: What do we do about the space junk?
sparking1   8/18/2011 7:33:26 PM
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I've been interested in astronomy and the aero- space industry since my childhood in the early '70s, and instinctively knew this was going to become a major(And dangerous) situation within a matter of years. What are our options? Lower orbits are not, and higher orbits require more payload (Fuel) cost, which already runs about US $20k @ lb. Within 50 years, our only option for a (Safe) site to begin further human habitation of our solar system will be lunar. We WILL go back to the moon again out of necessity. Although the costs will be staggering, we have no other safe option from debris that I see, and we WILL find a way to further our exploration of space. It is not only in our best interest to do so, but may eventually mean the survival of our species.

anon9303122
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re: What do we do about the space junk?
anon9303122   8/18/2011 4:34:41 PM
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Just aim our highly-collimated, laser-guided tractor beams at each piece of space debris and pull them one-by-one down to their firey deaths.

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