Breaking News
Blog

Chips in Space: Let’s look inside ARISSat-1 (Part 3)

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Dixy3
User Rank
Rookie
re: Chips in Space: Let’s look inside ARISSat-1 (Part 3)
Dixy3   9/1/2011 5:35:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi again Steve, Thanks for the excellent 3 part article, I have saved mine to disc for future reference but just wanted to say thanks for the great effort you and the team went too to create and launch the satellite, I hope she continues to give many people lots of enjoyment and the interesting data goes into the next project to help many more satellites big and small come through to future flights too. Just wish ITAR would ease up on all our AMSAT satellites and us all working together again as one International team. Best regards from us all over here, Chris GW6KZZ.

Steve Bible
User Rank
Blogger
re: Chips in Space: Let’s look inside ARISSat-1 (Part 3)
Steve Bible   8/31/2011 2:18:09 AM
NO RATINGS
Hi R.D., Thanks! We followed good engineering practices. Soldering was all by hand under a stereo microscope paying particular attention to make good solder joints. Components are industrial grade. The only component space rated was the solar panels. No paints or glues that out-gassed. I do plan a lessons learned blog or two or three. Stay tuned!

Robotics Developer
User Rank
Rookie
re: Chips in Space: Let’s look inside ARISSat-1 (Part 3)
Robotics Developer   8/29/2011 4:09:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for a nice series of articles! I was wondering what if any special fabrication methods were used to accommodate the space environment? In particular, type of soldering used for the PCBs, type of components (industrial, commercial, or de-rated use of these?). Would you be posting a lessons learned article as some point in the future?

Steve Bible
User Rank
Blogger
re: Chips in Space: Let’s look inside ARISSat-1 (Part 3)
Steve Bible   8/29/2011 3:24:50 AM
NO RATINGS
I was giving an update from previous blog posts. In summary, the battery was given to us. It is the same one used in the Russian Orlan space suit. The chemistry was Silver-Zinc, which was designed for high reliability - naturally for the suit - and not for longevity. We thought if we shallow charged it, it would last longer. Alas, it only lasted 8 days. So for the rest of ARISSat-1's operating lifetime, it will only operate in the Sun. I hope this helps explain the update and the battery choice. We will be thinking about alternative battery choices in the future. But we did learn from this mission.

kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc
User Rank
Rookie
re: Chips in Space: Let’s look inside ARISSat-1 (Part 3)
kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc   8/28/2011 8:36:29 PM
NO RATINGS
I meant "added costs" not "added caps" in that last post. Thanks!

kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc
User Rank
Rookie
re: Chips in Space: Let’s look inside ARISSat-1 (Part 3)
kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc   8/28/2011 8:34:34 PM
NO RATINGS
I was curious as to why you said the battery was dead and when the solar panels are eclipsed, the system resets. Why were rechargeable batteries or ultracaps not used to hold the system over? Added caps? The interrupted time was just not important? Just curious about that design choice :)

Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
EE Times editor Junko Yoshida grills two executives --Rick Walker, senior product marketing manager for IoT and home automation for CSR, and Jim Reich, CTO and co-founder at Palatehome.
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed