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A Ham's Eye View

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Carl Lump
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re: A Ham's Eye View
Carl Lump   10/26/2011 11:52:19 PM
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Hi Doug - Congrats on the new blog! Enjoyed all the comments - lots of similarities on my side: Article in Boys Life and "comic strip" in Treasure Chest (magazine distributed in Catholic schools) that centered on ham radio. SWL rx for Christmas 1958 (S-38E), licensed as KN3LJZ in 1960 via high school radio club (St.Joe's Prep in Philly), BSEE from Drexel, career in RF/microwave semis and related components. Joined FRC in 1962 - been contesting ever since under several call signs. Looking forward to many more blog installments ! 73 de Carl, K2CJ

Radionut
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re: A Ham's Eye View
Radionut   10/20/2011 12:17:35 PM
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Hi Doug, thanks for seizing the initiative and getting this blog up and running. I received a "Brayhead Radio Science Kit" as a Christmas present when I was ten years old and have been hooked on electronics ever since. It took a while to discover ham radio and I became licenced in 1976 at the age of 23. An elderly work colleague of mine had been a radio operator on Lancaster bombers during WW2 and he taught me Morse Code. He had a great sentence for helping to get a good rhythm on the key: "the word possesses possesses more esses than the word mississippi possesses". Cheers for now, Terry. G8MII

JimJarvis
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re: A Ham's Eye View
JimJarvis   10/20/2011 11:25:14 AM
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Doug! Great to see you surface, and can't wait for the ruminations, as the blog gets going. See ya in the pileups...from somewhere. N2EA/1 Bristol, VT

Bob5491
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re: A Ham's Eye View
Bob5491   10/8/2011 11:30:09 AM
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I would like to get into DSP & software design of radio's, not just be a user.

radiomanwy9a
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re: A Ham's Eye View
radiomanwy9a   10/7/2011 10:41:08 AM
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Well Doug, as you can see by the comments so far, it's obvious that ham radio has played a significant role in many an engineers decision to study electrical engineering. I guess I'm the odd man out when it comes to Morse code. I love it and learned it in about a week when I was 15. I figured since I knew the code I might as well get my license and got my Novice ticket in 1969 with the callsign of WN7QYP. Upgraded to General 6 months later (WA7QYP). Got my Extra callsign in Illinois (20 wpm code woo hoo!) and am now WY9A. I'm looking forward to reading the blog as well as all of the comments. Bands are opening up! See you there maybe. Ed

Kappy
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re: A Ham's Eye View
Kappy   10/5/2011 8:34:54 PM
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I got my first two ham licenses in March of 1954 and I have been W1AEL ever since, but not always active. My radio avocation led me to three EE degrees and a good career. Now that I am retired, there is more time for ham radio and woodworking; I keep so busy I wonder how I ever had time for work! Code was a problem for a while, but I have really enjoyed it for a long time. Thanks for the Blog, Doug, and HI to Bicycle Bill. Allan.

Inquire8
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re: A Ham's Eye View
Inquire8   10/5/2011 4:28:14 PM
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Great to see a Blog on HAM radio. Got a Novice license in 1969 and currently hold a General Class license. But as with many of us, education, family, etc. licences at times go by the way side and my goal of an Extra class license got lost in the mix. So I am hoping an Extra class license will happen in the next year. 73, KJ4CQU.

sq3r
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re: A Ham's Eye View
sq3r   10/5/2011 3:56:19 PM
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I was first licensed at age 12 in 1963, designed and built a 500W HF linear by 10th grade and was able to enter engineering school in 1969 in great degree due to the influence of ham radio and some great mentors. Three engineering degrees, several patents and many years later, I'm still totally loving the career that ham radio has led to. Never allowed the license to expire and am now active in VHF / UHF emergency ops with a penchant for inventing antennas. I feel ham radio provides a powerful means to mentor technical innovations which can contribute to the well-being of all. Yes, full, no, WARP, speed ahead on your new blog!

Clare N2RJB
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re: A Ham's Eye View
Clare N2RJB   10/5/2011 3:48:50 PM
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My father used to bring home radios he'd find in the trash on his laundry route - for me to take apart. I joined my high school radio club in 1956 and passed my Novice test. The Code was very difficult for me and I let the license lapse after a year but stayed interested in electronics ever after. I started out to get an EE degree at the Univ. of Buffalo but fell in love with an IBM 1620 when it was installed in the engineering building. A year later I went to work full time for the computing center and was in IT for 48 years. I built my first regulated power supply from an article in EE Times Jan. 15, 1973, back when it was on newsprint. I still have that article in my files and I still use that power supply from time to time. My oldest son and I got our 5WPM Technician tickets in 1992 and now we're both Extras. As I sit here I'm surrounded by computers, active ham radio equipment, a wall of antique communication equipment, mostly ex-military, and a growing tube collection. I'm happy to see your new Ham Radio blog and I hope it will continue for a very long time.

WKetel
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re: A Ham's Eye View
WKetel   10/5/2011 12:34:33 PM
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Like the others, I am looking forward to this blog, being about Ham radio from an engineering point of view. I became interested in electronics partly because of having been given a 1957 issue of the ARRL handbook. I was self taught in electronics when I started engineering school, which gave me quite an advantage for a while. I was not licensed until they dropped the code requirement for the tech class, since the code did serve as an effective barrier to keep me out. Then, when the code requirement was dropped completely I immediately went and upgraded to extra class, all in one session. One thing that has amazed me, after looking at the older handbooks, which I have some back to 1950, is that we did not lose so many hams with some of the incredibly unsafe constructions that were shown. I guess that hams must have been far more understanding about the hazards back then.

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