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Engineering practical jokes: A shocking trick

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15019 Rattlesnake Road
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re: Engineering practical jokes: A shocking trick
15019 Rattlesnake Road   10/6/2011 7:52:27 AM
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Good grief, all you have to do is interrupt current in the primary circuit when the door opens. The conducting path for the primary is between the door frame and the door hardware. The secondary (HV) side attaches to the doorknob on the inside. When you expect your roommate, you simply energize the primary with a hefty battery. The door frame is circuit 'common.'

David Ashton
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re: Engineering practical jokes: A shocking trick
David Ashton   10/5/2011 11:38:24 PM
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Did you watch the video Rene? still not much detail there though.

David Ashton
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re: Engineering practical jokes: A shocking trick
David Ashton   10/5/2011 11:37:40 PM
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You could do it with a 555 and a transistor. I once made a friend an electric fence driver with an old valve radio transformer and an ignition coil. On one half cycle the HV winding charged up a cap. On the next half cycle the 6.3v winding triggered an SCR which put the cap across the coil. You just had to get within half an inch and a spark would jump across onto you. My friend was called Frank, so we called my device Frank's Zapper...

ReneCardenas
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re: Engineering practical jokes: A shocking trick
ReneCardenas   10/5/2011 4:04:40 PM
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Did I miss link or additional text?, 2 sentences is all I cn read on this plot. No enough meat to go either way.

WKetel
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re: Engineering practical jokes: A shocking trick
WKetel   10/5/2011 12:23:37 PM
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There are a few details missing here, since, in the era that he plated this trick, automotive ignition coils did not include any interrupting means integral with the coil assembly. So we could assume that it was probably one of the very old Ford Sparking coil devices. If not, then it could be useful to know just how a more current coil was driven to work in this application.

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