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When we find life, what do we do next?

Kristin Lewotsky
10/12/2011 06:55 PM EDT

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Tiger Joe
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re: When we find life, what do we do next?
Tiger Joe   6/12/2012 6:04:55 PM
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...What kinds of instruments should the probe sport? We are a species driven by what we can see. So, nothing more than a glorified camera is needed. The technical challenge will be a signal of sufficient strength to travel X light years before reaching Earth, but I suppose if Interstellar travel can be made 1000x faster, then there should be no problem using the target star as a source of energy to amplify the return signal. Having to wait maybe 10-50 years for a signal is reasonable, given the travel time of the New Horizons mission to Pluto, a far less interesting mission, sent to analyze two chunks of ice that happen to be on the fringe of our solar system.

Quickbadger
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re: When we find life, what do we do next?
Quickbadger   10/13/2011 5:03:48 PM
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Albeit - some Christians themselves are ignorant of their own religion.

Quickbadger
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re: When we find life, what do we do next?
Quickbadger   10/13/2011 5:01:47 PM
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...and what will you say if our new extraterrestrial friends believe in the same creator? Creation and evolution are not mutually exclusive; to say so reveals ignorance about Christianity.

Kristin Lewotsky
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re: When we find life, what do we do next?
Kristin Lewotsky   10/13/2011 1:30:41 PM
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I know the distances involved are absurd, but I also know human nature. If, or rather when, we find life on another planet, the life on this planet won't be able to ignore it. Finding a habitable planet would spark interest and finding actual life would be front page news, but if that life proved to be intelligent? We wouldn't be able to rest until we established contact or at least knew more about the beings involved. Shoot, Project Icarus is already working on the problem, even with no life involved. The distances are completely out of scale with our capabilities and lifespans -- but the science and technology community would be expected to come up with the answers. How would you solve the problem?

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