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Travel Nightmares: Up the creek without a passport

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David Ashton
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re: Travel Nightmares: Up the creek without a passport
David Ashton   10/18/2011 7:24:25 AM
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You gotta wonder about (a) the guys who come up with these rules and (b) the guys who implement them. One guys say "no screwdrivers", the other guys say "ah, these are screwdrivers!" and it makes them all look like complete idiots....

BrianBailey
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re: Travel Nightmares: Up the creek without a passport
BrianBailey   10/18/2011 3:09:44 AM
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Yes - after 9/11 I had some nail clippers with me on one flight. In them was a 1 1/2" nail file. They told me they would have to confiscate them, or he offered to "break" the nail file to make it safe.

David Ashton
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re: Travel Nightmares: Up the creek without a passport
David Ashton   10/18/2011 1:44:12 AM
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Brian - in the "teaser" on the home page you said: "I find it interesting reading some of these travel nightmares and wondering what would have happened post 9/11." I've been out of the airline industry for over 10 years now but I'm sure that a lot of the things we used to be able to do, like the above, would be inaccessible now. I had the pleasure of getting the "jump" seat (behind the pilots) on a few occasions, and I doubt that would be offered now. And recently I was flying on domestic flights through Sydney Airport. I had a couple of "key" type screwdrivers - a flat and a star - on my car keyring. The security guys took them off me. No matter that they were only about an inch long each and that the car key on the same keyring - about 3 inches long - would have been a far better weapon. What's that ancient chinese curse? "May you live in interesting times...."

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