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The Battle of the Bands

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Nic Cohen
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re: The Battle of the Bands
Nic Cohen   7/27/2012 10:17:14 PM
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Excellent article, how would it take to low frequency, the sounds we don't always hear? Nic www.kdweb.co.uk

VK4TJ
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re: The Battle of the Bands
VK4TJ   3/7/2012 10:42:06 PM
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seaEE: Remote control experiments are *encouraged* on the ham bands. In fact, in many countries, it's called "amateur experimental service" to emphasize the uptake of new technologies.

JON-design
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re: The Battle of the Bands
JON-design   3/3/2012 6:54:03 AM
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As much of a pain as it is trying to figure out the various international regulations and bandwidth allocations I am stunned that we are ever able to reach standards agreements at all. Of course it is in the best interests of business globally to have standards and bandwidth agreements it's just that when you look at how closely allocation is tied to government bureaucracy it's amazing anything ever gets decided at all! Jon - http://www.evosite.co.uk/

seaEE
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re: The Battle of the Bands
seaEE   3/3/2012 4:51:04 AM
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Are all ham bands just for talking or can the ham operator use some frequencies to try remote control type experimenting?

WKetel
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re: The Battle of the Bands
WKetel   3/3/2012 3:25:49 AM
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The supposed "NEED" for more spectrum for data communication is based on what suppliers of services want to sell, not what people want to buy. Of course, if they provide it people will use it, that is the herd mentality, and marketing has mastered using it. It IS all about money. As for the newest ham band, 472 to 479, that will be an interesting band to experiment on, with a whole lot of materials available, since the frequencies don't demand premium materials. Lots of possibilities exist, including the use of 4000 series CMOS for signal processing.

Robotics Developer
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re: The Battle of the Bands
Robotics Developer   2/29/2012 4:46:50 PM
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The new amateur radio band is interesting both due to the challenges and the fact that the Hams are still being given consideration. I would expect that the Hams would welcome another band to work and it could provide a new band for collages and universities to use for experiments in low power and compact antenna design. I wonder what they will come up with? My son is a license ham operator and I wonder if he knows.

prabhakar_deosthali
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re: The Battle of the Bands
prabhakar_deosthali   2/29/2012 11:23:26 AM
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A very interesting and informative article. This gamut of frequency bands, their range,their allocation and use and possible cross talk effects , also the environmental effects on the signal transmission are all nicely covered in this short and sweet tutorial

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