Breaking News
Blog

Slideshow: Flying cork

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 21 Next >
View Comments: Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
re: Slideshow: Flying cork
junko.yoshida   7/19/2012 5:57:29 PM
NO RATINGS
Call me naive, but I had no idea how cork becomes cork from cork oak trees, until I stumbled into the Alentejo region and spent a week. Imagine my surprise. Seriously, airplanes using cork composites are cool (and intriguing), but the cork industry does need new mass consumer products that can make up for the revenue now getting lost in wine bottle stoppers.

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: Flying cork
old account Frank Eory   7/19/2012 11:32:37 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the interesting story and photos Junko. Indeed, cork has much more of a connection to engineering than I had realized. But it also still makes the best wine bottle stopper. I hate those synthetic ones. And screw tops? Not on anything I would ever drink!

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: Slideshow: Flying cork
Bert22306   7/20/2012 12:57:36 AM
NO RATINGS
I especially liked, "But engineering, like cockroaches, is everywhere." I'll remember to explain this to my wife. Who no doubt will agree with the "cockroaches" reference. I was under the impression that artificial cork was being used for wine bottles because there was a global shortage or cork? Some disease or other? So your article made me curious. Apparently not: http://www.rebeccawineintuscany.com/2007/12/is-there-really-cork-chortage-this-is.html And, like Frank, no screw-top wine bottle will find a place at MY table!!

_hm
User Rank
CEO
re: Slideshow: Flying cork
_hm   7/20/2012 2:25:46 AM
NO RATINGS
Very informative and nice to know so many useful highly engineering application of Cork.

seaEE
User Rank
Manager
re: Slideshow: Flying cork
seaEE   7/20/2012 4:18:13 AM
NO RATINGS
A cork adds ambiance and a sense of naturalness to wine. I recall a book I checked out of the library when I was little that used a wine cork as part of an electric motor. Google build a motor with a cork, and see what you find.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
re: Slideshow: Flying cork
junko.yoshida   7/20/2012 1:20:27 PM
NO RATINGS
I hear you Frank. But apparently, screw tops guys are doing a far better job in the war of words, trashing cork caps, blaming the wine gone bad on cork! Go figure. It sort of reminds me of any PR wars we deal in the high tech world... the louder you voice your opinions, you win. Of course, the engineering community tries very hard not to fall for it...

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
re: Slideshow: Flying cork
junko.yoshida   7/20/2012 1:37:38 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the link, Bert. It's informative. Of course, not every cork, harvested from cork oak, is of the same quality. So, some cork is definitely good for bottle stoppers for wine and others are not...at least that's what I learned from my host, Philip Mollet.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
re: Slideshow: Flying cork
junko.yoshida   7/20/2012 1:49:26 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for your comment. Indeed, I did google it, and found a classic design from the 1938 book "Things a Boy Can Do with Electricity" http://bizarrelabs.com/motor1.htm Far out. All kidding aside, material science in cork composite is advancing. See what a team of University of Delaware guys is doing: http://www.udel.edu/udaily/2012/jun/cork-sandwich-composites-061812.html

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: Slideshow: Flying cork
Duane Benson   7/20/2012 4:33:55 PM
NO RATINGS
This is a fascinating article. I had no idea how all of this worked and, as did Bert, I had thought that cork was in short supply. I had also thought that the use of cork was environmentally unfriendly, but your article shows that not to be the case.

chrisnfolsom
User Rank
Manager
re: Slideshow: Flying cork
chrisnfolsom   7/20/2012 5:55:35 PM
NO RATINGS
Thank you for the story - I also had heard of the cork shortage and while I also enjoy real corks for my wine I also have heard that artificial "corks" can be much more consistent and regulated (air exchange properties) to certain wine varieties. From the Engineering logical side I would much prefer corks be use airplanes or other industrial uses for many years vs used and trashed in bottles....Also, when will the "cork" with a microprocessor\zigbee\wifi monitoring temp\ph\O2 and updating your wine chiller\computer with updates be built ;)

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Top Comments of the Week