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Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement

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NitroWare.net
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
NitroWare.net   7/23/2012 8:58:24 PM
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The dark horse in this is AMD and Global Foundries What are they doing - arn't they doing a process change for some of their products going foward? AMD licensed the ARM as a security co-processor not sure if that is or needs to be 64bit.

resistion
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
resistion   7/23/2012 9:33:37 PM
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I'd watch out for Samsung, they would definitely see this opportunity.

resistion
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
resistion   7/23/2012 10:08:54 PM
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Let's remember wrapping the gate around silicon is an extra barrier to shrinking.

HS_SemiPro
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
HS_SemiPro   7/24/2012 6:33:40 AM
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Foundry has to make a technology available that can be suitable for all kinds of IP and design types. Intel has advantage of knowing what they are developing the technology for. Technology and design co-optimization. Same reason why IBM is still developing its own technology for its server chips.

KB3001
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
KB3001   7/24/2012 5:04:04 PM
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Intel and its acolytes are still trying the same old tricks: selling their products on features rather than benefits! Yesteryear, the name of the game was the processor clock speed, now it's FinFET :-) but the world has changed and consumers won't be conned again. There is more to product success these days than just the transistor/process technology (Ha!)...

askubel
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
askubel   7/24/2012 7:09:40 PM
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You mean benefits like 30% less power consumption on average vs 32nm? I for one, applaud Intel for marketing the technology behind these benefits rather than just telling consumers "It's faster, so buy it"

KB3001
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
KB3001   7/24/2012 8:57:50 PM
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Yeah, but what about the overall system performance, power consumption, battery life, software and hardware eco-system? Neaaahh, who cares, it's FinFET technology after all :-)

vdara
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
vdara   7/25/2012 12:50:18 AM
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So, why do ARM and TSMC bother to announce that they have FinFET in the roadmap? Since nobody cares it anyway.

KB3001
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
KB3001   7/25/2012 1:45:16 AM
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Read what I said above. On its own transistor/process technology is not enough these days. ARM and Co. have low power architectures, more efficient software tools, and a much larger ecosystem, which can more than compensate for a loss of 30% in power or speed performance at the transistor level (if proven). Of course, they will always seek to catch up with the latest and best transistor/process technology but that's not all what they are about. I repeat, system performance is not dictated by transistor/process performance alone. Intel want you to think that way because they are an IDM who want you locked into their way of doing things.

Hillol
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
Hillol   7/26/2012 2:53:02 PM
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Yes system is very key. In M2M or wireless, system performance is required. Process node can not solve all issues. HW+SW+Acceptance - that is market.

resistion
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
resistion   7/25/2012 1:03:52 AM
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The Ivy Bridge advantage over Sandy Bridge is not 100% clear: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ivy-bridge-overclocking-core-i7-3770k,3198-5.html http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ivy-bridge-overclocking-core-i7-3770k,3198-3.html

resistion
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
resistion   7/25/2012 1:08:40 AM
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About TSMC or foundries in general, they will never adopt new technologies unless it is clear customers will go for it. That is why they are not so "self-driven" as Intel or Samsung might be. That is why you need ARM or Qualcomm to first sign up. Even then, there is general reluctance. What if it is just one customer? Should other customers benefit so easily without putting in so much develop time? Etc.

resistion
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
resistion   7/25/2012 1:20:46 AM
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Intel's fins are like varying shape triangles (as pointed out in earlier articles). The leakage variation impact is clearer here: http://www.electronicsweekly.com/blogs/david-manners-semiconductor-blog/2012/06/intels-finfets-are-complicated.html

cdhmanning
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
cdhmanning   7/27/2012 3:35:00 AM
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I think "articles" like this are a sign of the times. Looks like EETimes is no longer really editing and is just becoming a low-quality channel for press releases and FUD-talk. The purpose of having an editorial is to keep the quality and screen out this sort of junk. Without that you're just cashing in a once-valuable brand. When the quality goes down, so will the advertising revenue. Oh well, once ESD stopped printing this was bound to happen...

abraxalito
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re: Intel vindicated by TSMC/ARM announcement
abraxalito   7/28/2012 1:29:21 PM
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I have a question. Intel is the undisputed foundry leader - no doubt about that. So why would the world leader in foundry process need 'validation' for what it said from its followers?

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