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The new economics of offshoring

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any1
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re: The new economics of offshoring
any1   3/11/2013 12:57:35 PM
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But, as we have seen in this economy, just because certain job functions are now back in the US does not necessarily mean more jobs. Companies have figureed out how to do more with less people.

Bert22306
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re: The new economics of offshoring
Bert22306   3/9/2013 9:37:09 PM
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Yeah, my reaction was very much like Erebus'. What your interviewee described is the way it's always been. The only thing that's changed over the years have been the over-simplistic sound bites that the average joe is fed. The search for the right balance of offshoring, or for that matter any type of outsourcing, and doing things in-house is a dynamic system. Just because one company today might have rethought some of its outsourcing decisions of last year, should not be taken as a whole new national trend.

EREBUS0
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re: The new economics of offshoring
EREBUS0   3/9/2013 9:16:15 PM
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Actually, it has never been simple. It is always driven by economic necessity. A world wide business is constantly looking at material supply, labor costs, shipping costs, advertising costs and support costs. Each area is open for the possibilities of where the the business might derive value from moving aspects of the production costs to other locations. So currently, it looks like bringing some jobs back to the US might be beneficial to certain businesses. We will see if that is really true when we see employment numbers improve. Just a thought,

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