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Sage solving an orphan EDA problem

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BillM210
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re: Sage solving an orphan EDA problem
BillM210   5/9/2013 12:37:04 AM
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I did not mean to imply this replaces Calibre. DRM is critical to anyone that does any type of physical design or Failure Analysis. Providing statistics as shown can help many different job functions in the supply chain. I bet this can be augmented to support package and PCB design rules. Being able to see how many occurrences and where they are located can be a huge help whether IC, pkg or PCB design.

BrianBailey
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re: Sage solving an orphan EDA problem
BrianBailey   5/8/2013 2:03:48 PM
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You are totally right that yield is a problem for the design house as well, but they only run the DRC deck rather than have to create it. They want good rules, but they are not the primary market for the Sage technology - unless they want to create rules of their own. Sage is not trying to replace Caliber, they are trying to improve the process of getting the rule deck to the Caliber folks.

BillM210
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re: Sage solving an orphan EDA problem
BillM210   5/8/2013 4:12:29 AM
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My first job out of college was working on a brand new CMOS process (double metal, double poly 5u...leading edge at the time) for a microcontrollor. My company had set new stds for excellent Memories based on NMOS processing but CMOS was new to them. As a Prod Eng, I was responsible for many different activities that included developing DRC rule decks for Applicon and Calma workstations. Our inhouse Fab produced a DRM book with about 25 pages for a 17 mask layer process. Trying to come up with various Boolean operations to test for width, spaces, enclosures and exclusions was a fascinating puzzle. Lots of testing to create an effective yet efficient DRC program. Their market is not just for the foundry's. It is for the design house as well as the system house (owner of the design). If yields are poor, the system house pays in two ways: increased part costs AND erratic volumes. Poor yields will require more wafers to meet demand and this depends if the foundry has the extra wafers for this poor yielding device. Foundry's with high utilization will try to maximize THEIR profits. This is done by mfg high volume AND high yielding designs. Lower volume/yielding designs will not necessarily get their required parts: known as the dreaded "allocation".

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