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Why are you still using C?

Why are you still using C?
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4/21/2003 08:22 PM EDT

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Techfreak_#1
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re: Why are you still using C?
Techfreak_#1   3/2/2011 7:13:37 AM
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Yeah as said by James W. Grenning, It is left to the designer to choose between C or C++ based on the application requirements.. But Programs written in C++ are easy to maintain and reusable.

Susan Rambo
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re: Why are you still using C?
Susan Rambo   3/1/2011 4:20:58 PM
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Yes, Expat Canuck: To find "Real men program in C" go to http://www.eetimes.com/4027479 Michael Barr wrote the column for Embedded.com in 2009.

Expat Canuck
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re: Why are you still using C?
Expat Canuck   3/1/2011 3:21:09 AM
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Wasn't there an article a few months ago in the EE Times Embedded section about how "REAL Men Code in C" ;-)

lwriemen
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re: Why are you still using C?
lwriemen   2/28/2011 12:24:36 PM
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I think the better question is, "Why are you still using 3GLs?" I would recommend skipping C++ altogether and programming in Executable UML (Mellor and Balcer). Use a model compiler to generate C code and avoid the overhead of C++ altogether.

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