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NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty

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Termohlen
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re: NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty
Termohlen   5/4/2011 3:31:51 PM
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FYI: The MS5603 has been renamed. It is now a part of the MS5803 series: MS5803-01BA (most sensitive) and MS5803-02BA (standard sensitivity). You may also want to look at the MS5611-BP. Cheers!

Termohlen
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re: NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty
Termohlen   9/3/2010 1:03:22 PM
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Robert, Nice project! Any tips on packaging? I have a friend that does CNC milling of Al and I've seen DIY poly-carb injecotrs. How did you do yours?

Termohlen
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re: NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty
Termohlen   9/3/2010 12:55:59 PM
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Auto-Pilot: That would take all the fun away. Betty is an enhancer, an auto-pilot would be like letting someone else fly the plane for you. Since I did what I could with 65 cents (an LPC11xx device), there isn't much power or memory left. I'd have to add a GPS and quite a bit more memory. I will add a--very simple--Kalman Filter to Betty in the next generation, but an auto-pilot would require a fairly complex one. I think that I could pull this off with an LPC32xx family device. I digress: These microcontrollers are turly AMAZING. I remember it like yesterday: The introduction of the Intel 8008 and the COSMAC ELF RCA 1802. We've come a long way. While a sophisticated toy, Betty represents a significant enabling technology. Some of the entrants in the LPCXpresso Challenge had some very exciting ideas, they simply unable to follow through to Phase-III. Thanks for the question

Termohlen
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re: NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty
Termohlen   9/1/2010 6:22:27 PM
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The source code (for all phase-II entries) is on the LPCXpresso Challenge web-site (link above). Trust me, I used almost every trick in the book. I did use look-up based math routines rather than using a standard floating point "power" routine, I used a log look-up routine: POW = exp(0.19026319L * log(P / 101325.0L)); rawHeight = 14544172.0L * ( 1.0L - POW ); /* Include conversion to feet and mult by 100 */

Termohlen
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re: NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty
Termohlen   9/1/2010 6:13:19 PM
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You'd have to understand the crusty bunch of Glider-Guider old farts (men and women... 95% men) that the name is marketing to. The average age of the folks that would use these things is probably mid to late-40's. Sorry for the offense. I take just as much responsibility as Brian.

Brian Fuller2
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re: NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty
Brian Fuller2   9/1/2010 5:33:15 PM
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Duane, I did give it a lot of thought. My first three headlines were just dull, though. To optimize story visibility, one has to strike a balance between the compelling/provocative and the dull but accurate. That said, those of us who came of age in the '60s and '70s certainly have language police buzzing off one side of our heads. Yet the propriety that we were taught back then seems, in today's culture, to be completely ignored. It's either true in absolute terms or it's true when viewed through the lens of a guy who's not 25 years old. And that is a another topic for another post!

Duane Benson
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re: NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty
Duane Benson   8/30/2010 11:42:55 PM
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I'm going to step out on a style/tact related tangent here. Is it just me, or do other people out there think it's high-time we did away with sexist slang identifiers like "Bitchn' Betty"? I know it may seem innocuous at first glance, and there certainly wasn't any intent to offend, but it and quite a number of other "...ist" slang terms really hearken back to the days when society was free, equal and happy - but only if you fit a certain profile. I don't think it adds anything to the article. The reference to it doesn't seem to do anything other than justify the article title. To me it distracts from what is otherwise a very informative article about a very cool project.

Chip.Fleming
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re: NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty
Chip.Fleming   8/26/2010 1:40:24 PM
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Oops, I meant nice job, DAVE.

Chip.Fleming
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re: NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty
Chip.Fleming   8/26/2010 1:39:27 PM
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Nice job, Brian, Have you given any thought to building an autopilot for your sailplane that would automatically recognize and circle in thermals? Gee, the Measurement Specialties website seems like it's being hammered this morning :-)

NevadaDave
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re: NXP design contest-Building a better Bitchin' Betty
NevadaDave   8/23/2010 6:37:19 PM
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Dave, Re the pressure-to-altitude conversion - I did some poking through a variety of websites and found several formulae for the conversion - what I'm interested in is how you did this in your software - for example, did you use floating-point and transcendental math, or did you come up with something that simplified the process, like a lookup table? I'm using a fairly small uC, and anything that limits code size would be a plus!

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