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The Week in Memory – 7/9/13

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Tom Murphy
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Fuhgetaboutit
Tom Murphy   7/9/2013 9:49:41 PM
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Seriously? We're going to worry about a downward blip in a fast-growing DRAM maker?  What does anyone make of that?  DRAM isn't going away, and two months do not a trend make.

Kristin Lewotsky
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Re: Fuhgetaboutit
Kristin Lewotsky   7/11/2013 12:51:40 PM
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Cataclysmic, no, but one of the fundamental rules of journalism is follow the money. Over the past 8 to 12 months, as DRAM has recovered from oversupply, predictions of a surging post-PC DRAM market have come thick and fast. Mobile DRAM was expected to be all growth, all the time. The reality has played out slightly differently, as the DRAM study just posted shows –with the pricing drops, mobile DRAM has actually lost market share. Depending on which analyst you listen to, PC makers are actually willing to pay a bit more for DRAM to ensure uninterrupted supply. The thing is, market research is always a tricky business, especially when the numbers are from suppliers and not the people writing the checks. that's why these monthly reports from vendors are useful in terms of helping us understand what is actually taking place. We build the picture a little piece at a time.

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