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Low Earth Orbit Satellite Tracking in Your Backyard

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rick merritt
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What's the app?
rick merritt   7/22/2013 9:59:53 PM
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Fascinating stuff but what's the motivation, as they say at technical conferences. Is this guy competing to have the best TV reception on the block or should we be calling the FBI ;-)

JeremySCook
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Wow
JeremySCook   7/22/2013 8:45:28 PM
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Wow, that is insane.  Nice find Caleb!


I don't think I'm a bad engineer, but seeing something like this always reminds me I've got a lot to learn still!

mcgrathdylan
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Re: But why?
mcgrathdylan   7/22/2013 8:12:29 PM
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A very good question. I have a feeling it is not unlike climbing a tall mountain because it's there. It strikes me as a personal challenge kind of thing. But I'd be interested in hearing more.

One question I have is: Why is he located so far from the dish? Couldn't he have set it up closer to him home?

Tom Murphy
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But why?
Tom Murphy   7/22/2013 7:42:32 PM
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This sounds like a clever chap -- good story, Caleb. But I stumble across one line:

 "Travis wanted to be able to track moving satellites..."

Now some people climb mountains just because they're there.   But that made me wonder why he wants to do that.   Any insights on that?  Anyone want to guess?

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