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7 Insurance Issues With Your Self-Driving Car

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AZskibum
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CEO
Re: Evolution already happening
AZskibum   7/28/2014 10:17:29 PM
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With ADAS, no matter how advanced, the driver will always be held responsible, because he or she is still in control. At the moment in which ADAS becomes fully autonomous and the human occupant is merely a passenger, the liability will shift away from the "driver" toward the manfucaturers. I agree with Bert -- this fact alone may prove to be a strong deterrent to fully autonomous vehicles.

Susan Rambo
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Blogger
Re: Do they even work in the snow /Ice?
Susan Rambo   7/28/2014 7:03:50 PM
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Good question. I went to a talk by a Google car engineer and he said they had only driven self-driving car in California Bay Area, so in other words, no snow (and no rain).

Loser99
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Rookie
Do they even work in the snow /Ice?
Loser99   7/28/2014 6:48:32 PM
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Has google or anyone even tested them in the mountains or in white out snowy conditions.  Iced over sensors?

What happens when one sensor fails?  does the car turn into a brick until the sensor is fixed?

Dont think we will ever see a fully autonomous one sold to the general public.

 

 

Susan Rambo
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Re: Evolution already happening
Susan Rambo   7/28/2014 6:06:17 PM
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If all someday cars are self-driving and all cars have collison avoidance, would there ever be car-on-car collisions again? Everyone would of course have to maintain their car's computer and camera systems, etc. Would there even be massive car pileups, of the type that happen in dense fog? Perhaps the cars' radar or lidar would stop that from happening.

Bert22306
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CEO
Evolution already happening
Bert22306   7/28/2014 5:19:30 PM
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I'm a little unsure when you're talking about truly autonomous vehicles, as opposed to driver assistance. If an accident occurs, who is at fault should be possible to determine in either case, especially because (I have to believe) the more autonomous, the more the vehicle will be provided with a "black box." My car, already several years old, has one, associated with the OnStar system.

In assisted driving, where the driver is always on the job, as it were, I would expect the blame to go to the driver most of the time. For instance, certainly ABS helps a driver in panic braking situations. However if it can be shown that ABS didn't quite "help enough," because the car skidded to much ragardless, allowing the accident to happen, my sense is that the human driver who is at fault will be found culpable, rather than the ABS system (it could have been tweaked better, some "expert" might assert, but I doubt that will carry a lot of weight in court).

Ditto for the automatically stopping systems, also meant to be driver assistance systems. If the system doesn't quite prevent the accident from happening, the driver who would otherwise have been found guilty will still be found guilty.

Fully autonomous is another thing. Black boxes should help determine the cause, and the auto manufacturers will be shelling out the $. I agree that this fact alone may help deter migration to full autonomous driving. So I have to agree that no-fault car insurance would likely be a prerequisite to autonomous vehicles, for this reason.

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