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IoE: Internet of Earthquakes?

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tb100
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CEO
Re: Unintended consequences
tb100   9/2/2014 8:06:08 PM
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They have this earthquake early warning system in Japan. You can see it in action on Youtube with one of the aftershocks of the Fukushima quake. You can watch the counter count down from 28 seconds until the earthquake hits:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQVPfQu50yY

In comparison we are in the dark ages in California. I've heard of lots of plans and studies and pilot programs over the years, but yet no actual working system online or connected to an alarm on our phones. I imagine it is still years away, due to the slow bureaucracy of the state and USGS.

GSKrasle
User Rank
Freelancer
Re: Unintended consequences
GSKrasle   9/2/2014 7:27:15 PM
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iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/visualizations has some amazing animations of the responses of arrays of seismometers to earthquakes in various parts of the world.

GSKrasle
User Rank
Freelancer
Re: Unintended consequences
GSKrasle   9/2/2014 7:19:02 PM
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Ubiquitous networked sensors can have amazing results. This application might serve to detect and locate other disturbances like loud noises (explosions, gunfire), etc. Essentially, Jawbone has made humans function as specialized sensors. I can also envision IOT giving much finer granularity and speed to mapping things like utility outages, and wind, water and fire damage. I have heard of a system of distributed detectors that rapidly identifes an earthquake and warns surrounding areas faster than the shaking travels, giving ppl at least a few seconds to find safety. Here in Seattle, they have figured-out how to measure traffic speed just by watching cell-phone traffic (presumably tower hand-overs).

Susan Rambo
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Unintended consequences
Susan Rambo   9/2/2014 7:03:32 PM
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Good point. Plus I don't suppose a sleep monitor would make any difference when a quake occurs during the day. Maybe a heart beat monitor or even a step counter might record some useable data. Probalby putting something on animals might be an interesting study.   Did you see that UC Berkeley says it can produce a 10-20 second warning before a quake hits. It uses the P-wave detected by sensors. Here's a paper about it.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
Unintended consequences
Duane Benson   9/2/2014 6:35:19 PM
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Usually the law of unintended consequences refers to something negative. This is an unintended consequence that could have positive benefits. Who would have thought that a sleep application could help with the understanding of earthquakes and the impact of earthquakes on a personal level?

Susan Rambo
User Rank
Blogger
USGS
Susan Rambo   9/2/2014 6:13:24 PM
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Jawbone should send its data to USGS. USGS collects eyewitness shake reports so if you feel an earthquake anywhere in the world, you can go on their site and log in what it felt like.

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