Breaking News
Blog

Liquid Nitrogen Experiments With Arduino

NO RATINGS
1 saves
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Bill_Higdon
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Too cool, literally?
Bill_Higdon   9/4/2013 7:54:39 PM
NO RATINGS
I worked at Moxtek in Orem Utah for a period of time in the lat 90's, they build low noise JFETs, assemblies containing the JFETs and other items for XRF (X-ray Fluorescence) equipment. When the JFET assemblies are operating they're cooled to a temperature close to liquid nitrogen the only reason they're not at the same temperature as the liquid nitrogen is they have a tiny heater that keeps them at their optimal operating temperature. When  not operating & turned off their temperature gets very close to the tempo of the liquid nitrogen. One of the tests I had to run was on some Honeywell Mil-Spec IR LEDs, was simulating the cold /hot cycles the equipment would go through. The diodes had to with stand being dunked into liquid nitrogen for a specified number of times. I looked at putting together a mechanical dunker for the tests, and decided I could get it done faster by doing it by hand. While the Diodes passed with flying colors any temperature color shift didn't make them visible.

Bill


kfield
User Rank
Blogger
Too cool, literally?
kfield   9/4/2013 3:50:02 PM
NO RATINGS
I really appreciate the irony in this comment on his website "When overclocking desktop processors one should be careful not to cool capacitors below 0°C even if it would require additional heating." 

August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Flash Poll
Radio
NEXT UPCOMING BROADCAST
How to Cope with a Burpy Comet
October 17, 2pm EDT Friday
EE Times Editorial Director Karen Field interviews Andrea Accomazzo, Flight Director for the Rosetta Spacecraft.