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kdwyer
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Re: Arduino vs the rest
kdwyer   10/9/2013 12:03:20 PM
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Yeah, I agree. Whatever about the Arduino IDE, the benefit of the Arduino shield compatible hardware is great for prototying and proof of concept or just plain old messing around! We @NXP are now making our LPCXpresso boards with these shields so customers can piggy back on this hardware ecosystem.

Caleb Kraft
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Re: Arduino vs the rest
Caleb Kraft   10/7/2013 3:11:01 PM
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It depends on what you want to achieve. Do you specifically want to learn C to carry that forward as a skill? If so, there's no need to focus on arduino.

Do you want to slap prototypes together quickly while getting a feeling for the programming? Arduino might be a good place to start.

Caleb Kraft
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Re: For amateurs?
Caleb Kraft   10/7/2013 2:48:46 PM
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haha, I don't think anyone who wants to learn arduino will be offended with me telling them it is a good idea. Usually it is the ones who build their boards from scratch who get annoyed at the mention of the arduino.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Arduino vs the rest
Max The Magnificent   10/7/2013 9:41:51 AM
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@David: ...one of my current "to do's" is to learn C, and that fact the the Arduino environment is "C-like' does put me off a bit [...] Could you - and others - comment?

Hi David -- I hope to be posting Part 2 of my advantires in Arduinoland later today or tomorrow, and I will discuss this stuff then.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: For amateurs?
Max The Magnificent   10/7/2013 9:39:59 AM
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@BillWM: There are just so many good options --- for many applications there are several solutions -- for others carefull sifting and study are needed.

It's like Duane said, thsi is sort of th e"golden age" for this sort of stuff -- who coudl have imagined anything like the processor platforms and associated ecosystems say 20 years ago?

David Ashton
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Arduino vs the rest
David Ashton   10/5/2013 4:49:16 AM
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Very interesting Max, especially the comments, and I look forward to the next thrilling installment.    I have heard reactions like Antedeluvian's before - ie that Arduinos are for amateurs - but in my case that's probably what I need.  BUT - one of my current "to do's" is to learn C, and that fact the the Arduino environment is "C-like' does put me off a bit - I wonder if I would not be better dealing with a pure C environment like Microchip's PICs - which do offer a vast array of capabilities and sizes.   Could you - and others - comment?

BillWM
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Re: For amateurs?
BillWM   10/4/2013 3:54:20 PM
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There are just so many good options --- for many applications there are several solutions -- for others carefull sifting and study are needed.

Duane Benson
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Re: For amateurs?
Duane Benson   10/4/2013 2:29:28 PM
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Tony re: "If you're getting into 32-bit land, it's worth checking out alternate ecosystems, such as the BeagleBone Black ($45) which is cheaper than the Arduino Due ($50)."

It's kind og a golden age for systems like this. Critical aplications generally take custom hardware, but for applications that can deal with off-the-shelf, there an incredible number of good options.

8-bit Arduinos are great for hobby and staters. 32 Arduino compatibles look like they may become a viable tool for non-critical embedded applications. The mbed fits that same place. The Beaglebone, Raspberri Pi and a few others are great low-end Linux systems. Move up to the Beagleboard XM and you've got a tablet-power system.

There's this new Intel Arduino compatible too. I'm not sure what to make of that one.

Duane Benson
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Re: For amateurs?
Duane Benson   10/4/2013 1:52:49 PM
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Max re: "And the great thing is that any programs you've written for the 8-bit boards will compile down to the 32-bit boards without any problems"

It's not 100%, but it's actually the closest I've seen to the elusive goal of write once run anywhere.

B_Albing
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Re: I have a project for you
B_Albing   10/4/2013 1:39:31 PM
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@Max - I shall notify the authorities....

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