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Whither My Solder?

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Duane Benson
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Re: Other lost skills coming back
Duane Benson   11/25/2013 9:16:20 PM
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Doug_S - It's incredibly easy to find schematics or other documentation for just about anything online. There are also tutorials for quite a few broken things. And, more parts seem to be available.

Doug_S
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Re: Other lost skills coming back
Doug_S   11/25/2013 9:00:15 PM
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Why do you say it is becoming viable again?  What is it about the failures of these recent devices that left you able to diagnose/repair them, versus the failures of devices a decade ago that you couldn't/didn't?

Caleb Kraft
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Re: Other lost skills coming back
Caleb Kraft   11/25/2013 5:28:32 PM
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part of why some of them are repairable for me is that there are great tutorials out there. I've replaced capacitors on a couple TVs that I never would have found on my own, but they were documented issues. 

Duane Benson
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Re: Is it becoming more common?
Duane Benson   11/25/2013 5:24:23 PM
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Caleb - looking at engineers like Jason Kridner (Ti Beaglebone camer and other projects) and Jeff Keyzer (Geiger counter, GHz Amps & such), I'd have to agree with you that there are engineers who still enjoy creating when outside of the corporate walls.

Duane Benson
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Other lost skills coming back
Duane Benson   11/25/2013 5:20:35 PM
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Many years ago, in a galaxy, pretty much right here, I'd expect to fix just about any electronic device of mine that failed. Somewhere along the years, component level repair became too expensive, too complex and in general, impractical.

However, along with the recent hobby re-revolution, that's been changing. In the last year, I've successfully performed component level repair on an LCD monitor, a gaming mouse, a digital camera and a few other similarly complex items. A decade ago, that would have been unthinkable.

Has anyone else found home electronics repair viable again?

Caleb Kraft
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Re: Is it becoming more common?
Caleb Kraft   11/25/2013 5:06:46 PM
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I think there are electronics hobbyists from all walks of life, especially now that we have fairly easy-entry things like arduino. I've known several engineers who have enjoyed the hobby as well.

Duane Benson
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Is it becoming more common?
Duane Benson   11/25/2013 5:03:50 PM
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I'm curious. Hobby electronics has exploded over the last few years. Has any of that been connected up with professional engineering? Like, do engineers-by-day become hobbyists after hours? If so, has that necessitated an increase in soldering skills?

Caleb Kraft
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need?
Caleb Kraft   11/25/2013 5:03:18 PM
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I don't know that they NEED to. I think everyone could benefit from being able to solder though, even people who aren't in the engineering world. Well, except for wizards they can just do whatever they want.

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