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Fire in the Hole

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antedeluvian
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There's an app for that
antedeluvian   12/3/2013 3:12:02 PM
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Max

Joseph immediately dragged a stool under the detector, mounted the stool, and started fanning the detector with a magazine.

I find my iPad ideal for this action. A free app, and the iPad doesn't even have to be on.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: There's an app for that
Max The Magnificent   12/3/2013 3:37:38 PM
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@antedeluvian: I find my iPad ideal for this action. A free app, and the iPad doesn't even have to be on.

Of course, if you had one of those Bell Apps then you coudl be sounding the alarm bell whilst fanning the smoke detector...

 

Aeroengineer
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Re: There's an app for that
Aeroengineer   12/3/2013 7:22:33 PM
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Where is the like button for this?  I can totally envision the panic and deperation in an effort to carry out the dedicated task.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: There's an app for that
Max The Magnificent   12/4/2013 10:00:50 AM
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@Aeroengineer: Where is the like button for this?

There are a bunch of "buttons" under the title to the blog, including a "Rate it" button.

Victor Lorenzo
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Re: There's an app for that
Victor Lorenzo   12/4/2013 3:26:08 AM
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antedeluvian, "I find my iPad ideal for this action"

If that would hapend to me last saturday, my hammer could also have 'definitevely' done that job. LOL.

...sorry, had too much marketry these days ;)

David Ashton
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Not listening
David Ashton   12/3/2013 11:14:39 PM
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Max.... "Did she listen to me? Ha. Why is it that no one ever listens to what I have to say?"

That's not strictly true.  Many of your readers on EE Times hang on your every word.  Not listening to anything you say is a wife's prerogative......

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Not listening
Max The Magnificent   12/4/2013 10:01:42 AM
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@David: Many of your readers on EE Times hang on your every word.

You smooth talker, you!

sa_penguin
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I'm a lateral thinker
sa_penguin   12/4/2013 4:29:06 AM
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I've never heard of a self-cleaning oven, I'm assuming its an electric oven. So the logical thing [from my perspective] would be to trip circuit breakers. THEN start waving away smoke.

Once enough smoke cleared, I'd start resetting the breakers. If the oven is on a clearly marked breeaker, I could leave that off (or trip only that one to start with).

All your home computers DO have protection from a power loss, don't they?

Victor Lorenzo
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Re: I'm a lateral thinker
Victor Lorenzo   12/4/2013 5:55:20 AM
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@sa_penguin: "I've never heard of a self-cleaning oven" One auto-cleaning method is to rise the oven's temperature at about 500ºC so the residuals/spills are burned and reduced to small particles (powder).

And that can effectively produce smoke! ;)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: I'm a lateral thinker
Max The Magnificent   12/4/2013 10:08:27 AM
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@Victor: And that can effectively produce smoke! ;)

Joseph would agree with you on that one :-)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: I'm a lateral thinker
Max The Magnificent   12/4/2013 10:04:24 AM
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@SA_Penguin: So the logical thing [from my perspective] would be to trip circuit breakers. THEN start waving away smoke.

He's an 18-year-old lad with no interest in science or technology -- he wouldn't know a circuit breaker if one crawled up his leg and bit him in ... a very unfortunate place.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: I'm a lateral thinker
Max The Magnificent   12/4/2013 10:07:38 AM
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@SA_Penguin: I've never heard of a self-cleaning oven...

As Victor said, the self-cleaning cycle raises the temperature way high -- all that's left afterwards is a thin sheen of fine white powder around the inside of the oven that you wipe off with a damp cloth.

I remember the gas ovens when I was a kid -- my mom used to have to put some caustic chemical foam thing in there to clean it -- after which the food tasted funny (well, funnier than usual) for ages...

David Ashton
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Re: I'm a lateral thinker
David Ashton   12/4/2013 2:41:11 PM
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@Max...caustic chemical for cleaning ovens,,,,I think that is caustic soda (Sodium Hydroxide) - they still use it for cleaning drains, which is fortunate as that allows me to steal some for developing PCBs :-)

Re Joseph - "He's an 18-year-old lad with no interest in science or technology" ... not even in cellphones?  Couldn't he call you or G then G for help?  A teenager without a celphone would be a unique beast indeed....

Max The Magnificent
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Re: I'm a lateral thinker
Max The Magnificent   12/4/2013 2:43:56 PM
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@David: He's an 18-year-old lad with no interest in science or technology...

It's so sad -- I am the dad I wish I'd had (if you see what I mean)

I keep on trying to interest him -- I'd love to teach him microcontrollers and electronics and stuff -- but when I show him flashing LEDs and things he just says "That's very nice Max" and then he wanders off to do his own thing :-)

 

David Ashton
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Re: I'm a lateral thinker
David Ashton   12/4/2013 2:51:16 PM
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@Max.... he'll probably turn into a mad artist (or an accountant or a lawyer) and earn more $ than all of us.

What about your other kid?

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: I'm a lateral thinker
Max The Magnificent   12/4/2013 2:54:15 PM
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@David: What about your other kid?

I've got two daughters (and four grandkids -- oldest is 19) from my first marriage; just Joseph from my current marriage.

David Ashton
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Re: I'm a lateral thinker
David Ashton   12/4/2013 3:02:15 PM
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@Max... "I've got two daughters (and four grandkids -- oldest is 19)"

And do any of them show any penchant for electronics?

Max The Magnificent
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Re: I'm a lateral thinker
Max The Magnificent   12/4/2013 3:04:43 PM
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@David: And do any of them show any penchant for electronics?

No, but at lesat the grandkids are impressed by my flashing LEDs LOL

Etmax
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Fire in the hole
Etmax   12/4/2013 6:12:35 PM
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We bought a self cleaning oven back in 1982 that had a special catalyst material all over the interior. It didn't have a special cleaning cycle, instead autocleaning each time a small splat of oil/fat hit the walls. We had it until 2000 and it was always spotless. It even survived my wife deciding to need to clean it with some chemical product thinking that would make it cleaner than clean. We would have it now still if it weren't for us selling the house it was in.


In our current house purchased in 2000 we got a new oven that had self cleaning liners covering some 60% of the interior so now we have to periodically remove liners and go through and clean the oven manually and the liners are always spotless.

Why would anybody think that liners covering 60% of the interior would be adequate?

I'm interested in hearing from anyone who can shed light on why we now think that we need to heat the oven interior to 600C to clean it when the catalyst seemed to work well at less than 300C over nearly 20 years.

The conspiracy theorist in me says MrMuscle had something to do with it :-)

jimfordbroadcom
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CEO
Smoke detector batteries?
jimfordbroadcom   12/5/2013 12:00:12 PM
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I'm curious as to why nobody thought to remove the batteries (temporarily) from the smoke detectors.  That's our solution for false alarms.  Just don't forget to put them back in!

MagFlux
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Re: Smoke detector batteries?
MagFlux   12/5/2013 9:41:54 PM
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My smoke alarms are all hard wired into the electrical system.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Smoke detector batteries?
Max The Magnificent   12/6/2013 10:06:47 AM
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@MagFlux: My smoke alarms are all hard wired into the electrical system.

As I just replied to a previous comment: "Our smoke detectors are wired into the main house power supply -- the batteries are there for backup, so removing the batteries doesn't actually stop the alarm -- neither does cutting the circuit breakers, come to that, because then the batteries take over ... the only way to stop them is (a) cut the circuit breaker AND pull the batteries or (b) re-program them with a mallet"

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Smoke detector batteries?
Max The Magnificent   12/6/2013 10:05:36 AM
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@JoimFord: I'm curious as to why nobody thought to remove the batteries (temporarily) from the smoke detectors.

#1 Again, we are talking about my technology-challenged 18-year old son here -- he doesn't even know they have batteries in them.

#2 Our smoke detectors are wired into the main house power supply -- the batteries are there for backup, so removing the batteries doesn't actually stop the alarm -- neither does cutting the circuit breakers, come to that, because then the batteries would take over ... the only way to stop them is (a) cut the circuit breaker and pull the batteries or (b) re-program them with a mallet 

Curie_US
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Smoke Detector circuits.
Curie_US   12/6/2013 11:56:02 AM
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In residential construction, depending on jurisdiction, "hard-wired" smoke detectors have been part of the building codes for over 10 years.  Additionally, when these units are used, they MUST be wired in a "3-wire" circuit, where the two main conductors (BLK, WHT) are the source power & the thrird wire (RED) is the "communications" wire.  IF a smoke detector on the first floor is activated, a signal is sent to ALL the others in the circuit, and they will begin to chime.  This was one of the serious problems w/ the battery-only units of previous decades.

Furthermore, in many jurisdictions, the circuit for the smoke detectors MUST be on its own circuit, not on a shared line.  Some jurisdictions require a separate small circuit breaker "box" tied directly to the main lines coming into the main C/B panel.

Wnderer
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Re: Smoke Detector circuits.
Wnderer   12/6/2013 12:30:21 PM
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Why don't these things have a button to shut off the alarm. I can't cook in my kitchen without setting off the smoke alarm. I then have to unplug the thing from the mains and remove the battery to shut it off. They just made a law in Maryland that the smoke alarms need to be replaced with ones that have non-removable rechargeable batteries. I think it's a plot.

Curie_US
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Re: Smoke Detector circuits.
Curie_US   12/6/2013 12:48:57 PM
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"Why don't these things have a button to shut off the alarm".  Probably because the industry & the regulators decided that to add this function would DEFEAT the omnipresence of the device.  Owing to people's inventiveness, MORE people than not would disable them w/ the push of a switch button.  That WAS one of the "nice" features of the old, battery-only devices.  They could be prominently displayed on ceilings throughout the structure, yet permanently disabled by omitting the 9-volt "transistor" battery.

Wnderer
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Re: Smoke Detector circuits.
Wnderer   12/6/2013 12:56:18 PM
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They could rig the button so the alarm was disabled for 5 minutes and needed to be repressed to disable it again. That way taping the button down wouldn't permently disable the smoke alarm. If fire fighters had to show up every time there was a false alarm, they would do something about it.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Smoke Detector circuits.
Max The Magnificent   12/6/2013 3:47:21 PM
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@Wnderer: I can't cook in my kitchen without setting off the smoke alarm.

Have you considered taking cooking classes? LOL

Wnderer
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Re: Smoke Detector circuits.
Wnderer   12/6/2013 8:38:38 PM
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@Max Have you considered taking cooking classes? LOL


I'm an expert at Cajun Blackened Pastries.:)

LiketoBike
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Hardwired talkative smoke detectors are spawn of the devil
LiketoBike   12/6/2013 3:30:02 PM
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The house we bought new 11 years ago had these evil devices.  Each bedroom has one, and the kitchen as well.  I didn't realize this for a couple of months, and I learned it in a rather aggravating way...

The master bedroom is on the ground floor, with a tall ceiling (about 13 feet).  My folding ladder is about 8 feet high.  Those detectors (don't remember the model) were really bad, and really sensitive to high humidity.  We moved into the house in December.  When spring arrived (along with that wonderful North Carolina humidity), the alarms (ALL of them) went off...about 3 AM.  I had to get the ladder, drag it around corners into the bedroom, stand on the next-to-the-top rung (because the top is just asking for trouble), reach up, yank the offender out...and find out that removing the battery didn't shut the little monster up.  I had to remove wire nuts, disconnect wires, keep from electrocuting myself, keep from falling, refrain from cursing too much, and do all this in a sleep-hazed condition...so that we could shut the little devils up and get some sleep.  All because there was NO WAY to cut the little devils OFF for a patently false alarm.  Of course, getting that one taken care of was followed by a merry chase to get the OTHER FIVE alarms in the house yanked out.  Fortunately, they were on shorter ceilings...

Not knowing that the recent humidity increase had caused this, the next day I reinstalled them all...because one wants their house and loved ones protected by smoke detectors, right?  Right?  Well, one does...except I had to repeat that adrenaline-charged experience AGAIN the next night.  Then I left them off.  ALL of them.  Don't worry; we soon had a monitored alarm system installed, including smoke detectors...GOOD ones...and it was ten years before one of THOSE gave us any issues, and that was outside a bathroom, where higher local humidity is expected.

So, I'm no fan of cheap smoke detectors OR building codes that attempt to impose things "for my own good"...  I guess this was more like "fire on the ceiling."

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