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Will You Take the Password Pill?

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rick merritt
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What can you (in)validate?
rick merritt   12/27/2013 12:41:56 PM
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I'd love to hear commentary on which of these feature folks think will be big and which will flop.

Robotics Developer
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
Robotics Developer   12/27/2013 3:46:38 PM
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I am very doubtful about the swallowed password pill; how long will it "stay with you" and what do you do to keep that pill "in your system"?  Seems like a technology looking for an application being forced..  I would rather see it used for medical monitoring.  The high resolution displays, especially those with lasting images when off would be a great way to save battery power and still provide user feedback.  If needed, the display could wake and refresh with new information and then go back to off/powered down.

David Ashton
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
David Ashton   12/27/2013 5:31:12 PM
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Imagine someone wants to hijack your car, which depends on you being near it with your "Password Pill" to work.  The hijackers will just take you with them for a bit, till they can defeat it.  No thanks.  (Sorry, I am originally from southern Africa, where car hijacking is somewhat of a national sport.....)

Crusty1
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
Crusty1   12/28/2013 9:01:40 AM
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Hi R D,

I agree with the pill problem of persistance within the gastro intestinal tract, may be a micro robot, acting like a tape worm might work?

Pill deploys a pincer to clip onto gut villi.

This would bring a whole new meaning to software worm.

 

wilber_xbox
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
wilber_xbox   12/28/2013 9:43:05 AM
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Really gross idea. How is it different than having a radio tags or chip implants in the humans. These ideas have serious ethical issues.

CTHP
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
CTHP   1/6/2014 9:24:46 PM
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I agree and I wonder, is this 2014 or '1984'? Seems like it would be oblivious to accept the 'more convenient' chip under the skin method rather than the pill just for longevity reasons alone. And if you start with the pill then why not upgrade to the subcutaneous implant later. Disguised as benign assistance, the chip could be used for all sorts of things like phone authentication, point-of-purchase authorization, on-person medical records, etc – all marketed to ease our lives of this growing burden. Since the wireless chip/pill does not require any conscience effort on your part, your life will be easier and trouble free. Of course nobody, including governments, will ever track your every movement through the brave new world ...

Robotics Developer
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
Robotics Developer   12/28/2013 3:29:04 PM
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Crusty1, I can only imagine trying to sell that idea to the general public: It is just like a tapworm!

It would make the Matrix bug extraction machine a reality as well.

 

I wonder if it made you sick would it be Malware?

 

 

Crusty1
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
Crusty1   12/29/2013 1:55:50 PM
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Hi R D , I am old and have a gross idea of humour.

After leaving school I first trained as a Medical Laboratory Scientist, with a speciality in Histo Pathology. Then I followed my hobby of electronics to earn more than the health service was paying.

In old age I have fun with trying to marry the two halves of my training. LOL

 

 

Robotics Developer
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
Robotics Developer   12/29/2013 8:24:30 PM
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Crusty1, sounds like an interesting marriage ( Med Lab Scientist + electronics)  sort of reminds me of the old Frankenstein movies with the "re-animation" of a body and all movie show electronics aka Jacob's Ladder.  What the Jacob's Ladder had to do with giving life is a mystery to me, having once created one for a hunted house.  Got some interesting shocks along the way, definitely "animated" me at that point!

daleste
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
daleste   12/29/2013 4:32:21 PM
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I don't think the password pill will be swallowed by the consumers.  Finger print sensors work fine for me.  I don't have anything important enough for some one to cut off my finger to get my password.  I'll leave that to the double naught spys.

Robotics Developer
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
Robotics Developer   12/29/2013 8:19:53 PM
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Daleste, I would think that if more security is needed then they could use retina scans.  If memory serves me correctly, fingerprint scanners can be tricked (Myth-busters did it) but retina scan seem much harder.  I could see the password pill not getting very far especially when it is too easy to use your cell phone or a wireless fob.  I do think the most useful application is in the medical monitoring area for getting an inside view without surgery.

daleste
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
daleste   12/29/2013 9:01:01 PM
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Yes, retina scans are better.  I think that was used in a bond film where the eye ball was transplanted into the bad guy.  I still don't think my data is worth it, but somebody's data is.  If it is just for your laptop, they would have to steal it first.  I guess the key is that you need to protect your passwords for financial and business accounts.  Two factor authentication works well for those.

zewde yeraswork
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
zewde yeraswork   12/30/2013 8:51:28 AM
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Is there really a need for something that goes as far as the password pill? Are people having that much trouble with their passwords as it stands? Otherwise, it seems like the ethical issues and the initial discomfort may be hard to wash away. If our audience, mainly made up of engineers and people who are more likely to adapt to and welcome technology find it to be a nuisance, an encumberance or a downright invasion of bodily privacy--as seems to be the case--then the general public will likely feel the same way. Maybe years from now, when people are used to the pervasiveness of personal identification technology, this could see the light of day but even then only in limited use.

wilber_xbox
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
wilber_xbox   12/30/2013 8:59:39 AM
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I donot how many people are using the latest iPhone offering of fingerprint scans. In most cases, biometric scans are enough for identity verifications. I donot understand the need to go for invasive technologies such as pills or implants.

Rcurl
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
Rcurl   12/31/2013 8:12:43 AM
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While we're being gross- If you were to retrieve a bunch of pills before they got to the sewage processing plant, would they still work? If the legitimate owners of the pills are having to take replacements every day or two then there should be lots of "used" ones out there. 

rick merritt
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
rick merritt   12/31/2013 3:29:20 PM
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@RCurl: Back in the day, as gross as we got was talk of going through the garbage for corporate secrets. It seems digital technology is taking us to new lows ;-)

AZskibum
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Re: What can you (in)validate?
AZskibum   12/27/2013 5:38:19 PM
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Besides extreme security, the author mentioned several other features that are not so extreme, and I think some will achieve significant market success. For example, the bistable secondary screen which, as he points out, "lends itself well to tablet covers which scream out for a dual purpose such as a secondary display."

For serious amateur photographers, and perhaps even pros, the lens array -- especially the separate lens array that communicates wirelessly with the phone -- is a no-brainer.

And on the audio side, it goes without saying that we can expect better voice & music quality, louder, richer-sounding speakers -- even in the tiny form factor required by a smartphone -- and all the DSP that is required to make that happen.

Not extreme at all -- just the natural evolution of features that might've been "gee whiz" a couple years ago, but which are now within the realm of affordability...and desirability.

ANON1249426187345
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I guess that's one way to ensure that passwords are changed "regularly"
ANON1249426187345   12/27/2013 12:44:26 PM
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"Once swallowed, the pill is powered up by electrolytes in the body to create a signal making one's entire body into an authentication token."

When I, um, "lose" my password pill unexpectedly, will Amazon send a drone helicopter to the restroom with a replacement?

I think our IT deparment would decline to assist with password recovery in this case.

 

zewde yeraswork
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security
zewde yeraswork   12/27/2013 3:15:32 PM
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How far do people think companies like Apple will go in the direction of securing their customers' devices? I wonder because while Wall Street may seem to appreciate better security features, end users are a mixed bag between those who care immensely about protecting themselves and those who don't seem to have especially critical information or who aren't worried about protecting it. Where will the norm lie exactly in the coming years?

DU00000001
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What were (are) they thinking ?
DU00000001   12/27/2013 4:15:19 PM
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Time for the gastrointestinal passage varies between some 8 hours and 3 days - depending on the current condition of your gastrointestinal tract. Somehow neither practical nor well- defined.

To increase the retention time simply do whatever is required to develop a constipation. Regarding the side-effects: ask your doctor or pharmacist :)

BTW: the Leclanché-battery they seem to prefer comes hand-in-hand with your daily dose of zinc - in the best of all cases. Other electrodes are possible but less desirable.

Robotics Developer
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Re: What were (are) they thinking ?
Robotics Developer   12/27/2013 4:19:13 PM
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I figured between 1 and 3 days max, thanks for the posting!  I would think that someone would instead suggest implanting the chip/pill so that it would not pass but be "permanent".  I wonder what the medical effects of such a procedure would be?

DU00000001
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Re: What were (are) they thinking ?
DU00000001   12/28/2013 5:05:49 AM
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With the current proposal implanting is not an option as the electrodes wear out.

In principle and using current RFID technology, implanting a device is possible without significant side-effects. On one side an implantable device has to be powered from "outside", on the other side such a permanent device bears the risk of being "hacked". It's not too difficult to emulate passive devices and more sophisticated active devices require quite an amount of power.

prabhakar_deosthali
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re:password pill
prabhakar_deosthali   12/28/2013 2:00:27 AM
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In my opinion, the password pill is a crazy and impractical Idea.

When you have now such things as biometrics and retina scans as more authentic and permanent means of person's identification and authentication why would you need such things as pills to be taken every day as a password.

Who will program such pills  and how secure they will be from duplication?

 

 

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