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Your Most Memorable EE Times Article
1/10/2014

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Bernard M. Gordon
Bernard M. Gordon

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dcblaza
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My pick of the best stories in EETimes
dcblaza   1/10/2014 11:24:52 AM
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There have been so many great reads in EETimes over the years and I owe much of my electronics industry education to the editors of this publication but three stories jumped out of my little grey cells ranging from dogged journalism, IP theft to murder!

 

Probably one of the biggest stories ever in EETimes was Alex Wolfe's coverage of the math error in the Intel Pentium processor; it went viral (even back then) and showed how important real journalism is.  My second pick is the relentless coverage that EETimes undertook in the Avanti IP theft case.  Diligent work by the editors showed that Cadence code had been lifted wholesale by Avanti.  Finally and the most bizarre is the case of the hit man CEO.  Amr Mohsen was CEO of Aptix and got entangled in a patent dispute with Quickturn but he then tried to have the judge in the trial murdered. http://www.eetimes.com/author.asp?section_id=14&doc_id=1285369

 

You really can't make this stuff up.  Keep up the good work and as a post script I think Junko Yoshida's story in 2013 on the Toyota acceleration case is also going to be a classic.    

 

DataBass
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Memorable EE Times Article
DataBass   1/10/2014 2:34:44 PM
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What's sad is I'm not positive it was from the EE Times.

About 34 years ago, I was working at the US Army Yuma Proving Grounds and was getting EE Times(?).  There was a letter to the editor from the wife of an engineer.  Instead of the usual comments on how precise we tend to be and how we often use language to say exactly what we mean and interpret others spoken communication the same way and how that drives the wives crazy, this person talked about all those things in a positive light.  She appreciated that when he said something, he would mean exactly that.  She didn't mind that if she said "You Always Do X!" and he responded that on dates Y and Z, he didn't do X.  It was a wonderful "article" and I had a copy of it for many years; sadly now lost.

If this sounds familiar and anyone has a copy of that or knows which issue it was in, I'd love to get a copy again.

Especially since I often tend to drive *my* wife crazy!

MeasurementBlues
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Re: Memorable EE Times Article
MeasurementBlues   1/10/2014 2:42:56 PM
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@DataBass, thanks for sharing your story. If anyone ahs the article and it's from EE Times, please send it to martin.rowe@ubm.com and we'll post it and publish a link.

pmyg89
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Re: Memorable EE Times Article
pmyg89   1/13/2014 4:49:05 PM
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For me the EE Times article that first comes to mind is the one about the Pentium FPU flaw. If memory serves, EE Times may have even broken the story, which became a splash in the regular papers. For someone like me, interested in CPUs and how they are designed, that story and the articles that came later made for very interesting reading.

MeasurementBlues
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Out the window
MeasurementBlues   1/10/2014 2:50:18 PM
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A quick story about that summer job. At the time, Semiconductor Circuits was based in Haverhill, Mass. in an old brick building along the Merrimack River. (No air conditioning, by the way.) So, we had the windows open all day. The lab was on the second floor and one of the techs had his bench by the window that was directly above a dumpster. The company made potted "brick power supplies at the time. We would get some from production that the production techs were uable to repair. If we had one that was beyond repair, we'd literally throw it out the window to the dumpter below. In fact, we would routinely pitch dead supplies across the lab to him for dropping to the dumpster.

Matt Tuley
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Modest to a fault
Matt Tuley   1/13/2014 3:36:52 PM
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Oh, this one's easy. Martin Rowe's interview with me! I'll admit to some bias in my choice. http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1320370&

betajet
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The latest EE news
betajet   1/13/2014 7:27:33 PM
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I don't have a particular Geek Times article.  I read (or at least scanned) Geek Times weekly to get the latest news and to read about the latest technology, because Geek Times generally had the information first.  A week later, it was last week's news, so not particularly memorable or archival.

For memorable articles, my publication of choice was Electronics magazine, which I first started reading in the public library when I was a teen-ager.  I found out that you could send in the "bingo card" and get all sorts of data books for free -- what a deal!

My most memorable Electronics article: "RISC: Is it a Good Idea, or just another Hype?", by Clifford Barney and Tom Manuel, 5 May 1986.

Victor Lorenzo
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What's all this ---- stuff anyhow?
Victor Lorenzo   1/15/2014 3:22:29 AM
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In late 80's I started reading a magazine, Electronic Design if my memory does not fail, and there was a section that called my attention "Pease Porridge". I really enjoyed reading those "What's all this --- stuff, anyhow?", it was fun and instructive.

I also remember several articles about the Pentium flaw. At that time one colleague created a modified C DSP/math library that was able to circumvent it.

antedeluvian
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What I remember
antedeluvian   1/16/2014 4:38:24 PM
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Martin

EE Times was a weekly newspapaer, and so it ran more business than technical electronic stories althougn at the end of the print era it carried an excellent technical column on analog design which morphed into Planet Analog today.

There was a columnist writing from Japan (an American) and unfortunately I can't remember his name. One column I particularily remember was when he described how the Japanese were prepared to pay more for a product that supported their own industry as opposed to the North American approach to buy on price alone. That was some time ago, and I thought it rang true then , but given the long time funk of the Japanese economy perhaps it wasn't as insightful as I originally thought.

antedeluvian
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Frank Burge
antedeluvian   1/17/2014 8:31:55 AM
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I also remember the columns by Frank Burge about life in general.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: Frank Burge
MeasurementBlues   1/17/2014 8:48:27 AM
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Frank Burge, Electronic Business. Acquired by Cahners/Reed (my former employer). Folded into something else. Long gone now. Frank and I worked in the same office at one time.

antedeluvian
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Engineer's Bookshelf
antedeluvian   1/17/2014 8:44:42 AM
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On the back page in later years there was a sometime feature that had book reviews of general books that engineers were reading. The first one that caught my eye was by Clive (as he was known then) Maxfield on "The Disappearing Spoon". A little later in his "Cool Beans" blog, Max asked for reader contirbutions and I thought "Why not?". My first on the book "The Flyers" is actually still on the web in magazine format. You can find all the contributions at the Engineer's Bookshelf URL. Unfortunately this has not turned out to be a very popular feature.

My 3 reviews were the last step before I was invited to blog for EE Times (as part of Microcontroller Central)  and so has some personal significance.

MeasurementBlues
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Anyone have a Bernie story?
MeasurementBlues   1/17/2014 8:57:47 AM
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To those of us in Boston and in the analog measurement business, Bernie Gordon is a legend. There are zillions of Bernie stories out there. Do you have any?

As I mentioned in the story, Bernie had a pair of boxing gloves in his office. Indeed, you could say that he "pulled no punches." He speaks his mind, that's for sure.

Bernie is passionate about engineering eduation, having given millions to engineering universities.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: Anyone have a Bernie story?
MeasurementBlues   1/17/2014 9:01:59 AM
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In my first job out of college, I was at Analog Devices. The company meade ADC, DAC, and instrumentation amp modules made of discrete components at the time. I was in product engineering. My first task was to compate and ADI module with an Analog module. I had a schematics of the ADI module. After tracing the Analog module, I conslcuded that the two were identical. I asked the manager "Who copied who?"

He replied, "We copied Bernie."

Noboady at ADI ever referred to Analogic by its coporate name. We simply said "Bernie."

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