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Who Needs 64-Bit or 8-Cores?

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_hm
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CEO
Onus will be on Marketing Department
_hm   2/1/2014 5:41:37 PM
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Yes, your proposal looks very logical and should be true. But other part of story is marketing the device. If they really exploit this and people adept to this, it will be win big win for this organization.

JimMcGregor
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Blogger
Re: Onus will be on Marketing Department
JimMcGregor   2/3/2014 11:22:50 AM
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hm, I completely agree that in some markets and for some applicaitons, marketing is critical. However, not everyone or every region is receptive to the OEM branding. In many cases, these lower-end devices are branded and marketed by the wireless carrier, and price is pushed as a critical factor.

gaberowe
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Rookie
Getting closer to single chip smart phone
gaberowe   2/3/2014 12:45:20 PM
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From looking at the spreadtrum site: http://www.spreadtrum.com/en/products/basebands/view/sc7715

The fact that they integrated the PMU and modem in a single chip is pretty interesting. I guess they still need an external RF IC for the WIFI/BT/FM/GPS RF segment -- but its not clear... maybe the external multimode RF transceiver they show somehow also covers 2.4GHz band?

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