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Networking for Engineers: Building Bridges

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DrQuine
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CEO
Networking and Jobs
DrQuine   3/14/2014 5:40:39 PM
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I find that 7 of my 9 "careers" were jobs that I gained by "networking" although I wasn't conscious of that fact at the time. In retrospect, it makes sense that people who know me well professionally would be people who might recognize a promising position elsewhere when (or before) I was looking. Expanding horizons by meeting people in a variety of disciplines also helps to build resources for problem solving in the future. Ideally, these interactions will be interesting discussions and learning experiences rather than speed networking marathons in which there is no meaningful information exchange.

Susan Rambo
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Re: Consequences
Susan Rambo   3/14/2014 5:12:51 PM
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Oh no! LOL. Just remember sometimes the smartest seeming guys in the room are actually the dumbest.

perl_geek
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Freelancer
Consequences
perl_geek   3/14/2014 2:53:58 PM
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I can't shake a lingering fear that the more I network, the more people become convinced that I'm the village idiot.

JeremySCook
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Blogger
Re: spot on
JeremySCook   3/13/2014 7:08:57 PM
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Thanks for the comment.  I really enjoyed writing this pair of articles, and I'm glad to end with the "good side!"

JeremySCook
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Re: I'm terrible at networking with humans
JeremySCook   3/13/2014 7:07:49 PM
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Yeah, that's probably true for a lot of kids.  Being comfortable meeting people is definitely something I had to develop later - I was very quiet in high school, but in college and beyond I was really able to overcome some of my awkwardness...  Or at least be comfortable enough with it not to really care!

betajet
User Rank
CEO
I'm terrible at networking with humans
betajet   3/13/2014 1:18:42 PM
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I think a big reason I ended up in computer engineering is that I grew up in a neighborhood with no other children (other than my older sister) so I quickly learned to be comfortable spending lots of time by myself concentrating on problem solving.  If I'd grown up differently, perhaps I could do "hello fellow well met" and rise to royalty instead of spending time learning how to do cool magic like Merlin.

I think there are many engineers who are like me.  Otherwise ThinkGeek.com wouldn't sell this cool T-shirt which says:

You read my t-shirt.

That's enough social interaction for one day.


Caleb Kraft
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Blogger
spot on
Caleb Kraft   3/13/2014 10:58:53 AM
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Absolutely true. Sometiems my antisocial side gets the better of me and I don't shake as many hands as I should, but that networking can be so extremely important.

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