Breaking News
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 5   >   >>
BisDevGuy
User Rank
Rookie
Re: ASSP
BisDevGuy   7/9/2014 6:52:32 PM
NO RATINGS
Wow Max, cudoes for writing a short article that get's so much attention and debate. To your original question, I recall Altera being the first to use the term System on Programmable Chip (SOPC) back about 15 years ago when they had the Excalibur product line. I always thought this term was sufficient for similar devices including those from Xilinx. However, since these devices were not that popular back then, the need for an industry term focused on a new breed of programmable silicon devices wasn't so necessary.

As George pointed out in an earlier post, today, the lines are becoming much more blurred in terms of what Altera and Xilinx offer versus full custom devices. Today, traditional ASIC/ASSP development teams are including FPGA capability in their devices. Some of this integration is occuring within one monolithic device and some are integrating with 2.5/3D techniques. With that in mind, I think we should revert back to naming the device based simply on how it will be applied in the overall system and call it either an ASIC, ASSP. Almost all of these will contain some sort of processor and incude some memory....so it might be time to retire the term SoC too. 

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Field Programmable ASSP
Max The Magnificent   6/27/2014 10:07:57 AM
NO RATINGS
@edastech: What about SOPC ? System on programmable chip

I like it!

edastech
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Field Programmable ASSP
edastech   6/27/2014 12:52:41 AM
NO RATINGS
What about SOPC ? System on programmable chip and every system is having atlest one processor Regards Rajesh

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Field Programmable ASSP
Max The Magnificent   6/25/2014 2:24:27 PM
NO RATINGS
@AZskibum: ...by the way, isn't everything a mixed-signal IC?

Don't start going all Zen on me! LOL

AZskibum
User Rank
CEO
Re: Field Programmable ASSP
AZskibum   6/25/2014 2:19:03 PM
NO RATINGS
"This is very interesting -- something to think about -- the capitalization of FP and ASSP remonds me of the a/D (little 'a' big 'D'), A/D, and A/d (big 'a' little 'D') to talk about mixed-signal chips and indicate the relative amount of the analog and digital functionality."


I too have often used the terms "Big A/Little D" and "Big D/Little A" for mixed-signal ICs -- by the way, isn't everything a mixed-signal IC? -- but those terms relate just as much to design methodology as they do to the relative amount of analog vs digital content. Big A/Little D can be thought of as "schematic on top" and Big D/Little A can be thought of as "netlist on top." The former refers to traditional analog design methodology and the latter refers to traditional digital design methodology.

Choosing the optimum methodology for a particular mixed-signal design can make a big difference in die size, performance and schedule.

George Janac
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Field Programmable ASSP
George Janac   6/25/2014 1:11:26 PM
NO RATINGS
Important thing about FPASSP is everyone is trying to expand their markets. FPGA is trying expand their reach by adding ASSP content which is small enough in dies size not to radicaly increase their high device costs. The ASSP vendors are willing to add a FPGA or programmable die area to offset their high NRE costs by making their devices suitable in adjacent applications.

But all this is a problem, and an opportunity. FPGA customers now have to use IP for which they must write drivers and do software. Work they are not used to. ASSP users now have to understand how to deal with non-fixed resources and tools that program them. Both sides need new support from EDA, IP, and software. Simply a manner ot economics and how architectures map onto devices.

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Field Programmable ASSP
Max The Magnificent   6/25/2014 10:34:06 AM
NO RATINGS
@George Janac: The capitalization of FP and ASSP reflects the dominant partition in the device.

This is very interesting -- something to think about -- the capitalization of FP and ASSP remonds me of the a/D (little 'a' big 'D'), A/D, and A/d (big 'a' little 'D') to talk about mixed-signal chips and indicate the relative amount of the analog and digital functionality.

George Janac
User Rank
Rookie
Field Programmable ASSP
George Janac   6/25/2014 10:27:10 AM
NO RATINGS
Max;

We at ChipPath have been working on mapping Zynq-7000, SmartFusion-2, SoC FPGA for over two years and the term we use is FPASSP. Field/Factory programmable ASSP. These devices have a fixed functional parts in the CPU subsystems like ASSP and programmable parts in FPGA or Metal programmable blocks. Three are two partitions hence the combined acronym.

Devices covered:

1) Zynq-7000, Cyclone-V, Arria-V, SmartFusion-2 - FPGA programmable Cortex-A9, etc (FPassp)

2) ST Spear - Metal programmable fabric blocks plus Cortex-A9 or A15. (FPASSP)

3) Future: ASSP like OMAP or NXP with FPGA blocks on board (fpASSP)

The capitalization of FP and ASSP reflects the dominant partition in the device. In Zynq the CPU partition is less than 22% of the overall die, FPassp. In 3) we will see less that 20% dedicated to FPGA programability, fpASSP. Metal programmable fabrics tend to be more even.

Reason other acronyms don't work as well is SoC implies a full mask set. This is clearly not the case since the NRE is low to zero. Second is the functions are fixed hence go along with ASSP. Mapping architecture these new devices requires complex functional mapping as well as traditional FPGA resource mapping. This all will lead to a new category of EDA tools and IP.

Interesting to hear comments  -george janac-

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Is an ASIC and SoC, or vice versa?
Max The Magnificent   6/24/2014 5:22:04 PM
NO RATINGS
@Elizabeth: The proper answer of course is C: none of the above or maybe it's D: all of the above.

Well, that certainly clears things up LOL

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Ooh-ee!
Max The Magnificent   6/24/2014 5:21:06 PM
NO RATINGS
@Andrew: ...but I hear there is even a world outside the walls of the engineering college...

You can't believe everything you hear LOL

Page 1 / 5   >   >>
Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
Join our online Radio Show on Friday 11th July starting at 2:00pm Eastern, when EETimes editor of all things fun and interesting, Max Maxfield, and embedded systems expert, Jack Ganssle, will debate as to just what is, and is not, and embedded system.
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Top Comments of the Week