Breaking News
Blog

Hot Chips 26 Heats Up

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 2 Next >
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Sheetal.Pandey
User Rank
Manager
Re: IoT is useless and dangerous
Sheetal.Pandey   6/27/2014 4:13:54 AM
NO RATINGS
Whether we like it or not Internet of Things is going to come and going to overpower the future of mankind like how internet is right now. When human were born or evolved they lived in jungles and got everything from nature to live. As their needs grow they invented many things.. its not that humans cannot live wihout phone.. they can but only thing they will be in an unconnected world. I remmeber when Internet or web boom came many elders told they still like conventional way of banking and talking etc..but now even 70 year old can use phone so well and talk about serching in google. THings will change and people will adapt Internet of Things. As they say " You can either love it or hate it but you cannot ignore it"

_hm
User Rank
CEO
All Digital only?
_hm   6/27/2014 3:33:58 AM
NO RATINGS
It looks chips are only digital and processing related. How about other chips? They should be hot too.

Susan Rambo
User Rank
Blogger
Re: IoT is useless and dangerous
Susan Rambo   6/26/2014 11:18:15 PM
NO RATINGS
What if the future is more diverse: some people may never want to be connected or prefer to limit or avoid technology, and so there may be lower tech versions of products; however, they would probably more expensive and niche. Technology also may not be a good solution for everything anyways. I agree that any extra maintenance puts a burden on the user; naturally a lower-maintenance product that functions as well, or at least better, may win market share because the average consumer would rather be doing something else besides updating appliances.

robert-in-houston
User Rank
Rookie
IoT is useless and dangerous
robert-in-houston   6/26/2014 3:18:36 PM
NO RATINGS
The "internet of things" is the most useless and dangerous idea since nuclear weapons, except that nukes were at least useful once to end WWII.  But they are equally dangerous.  We cannot secure PCs, much less phones.  Imagine a thief programming your vacuum cleaner to collect your valuables and rendevous with a trolling van.  Imagine an opposing government programming all doors in the country to lock and defeating any manual overrides.

 

Imagine people fiddling with devices in their house while driving.  Oh, yeah, my office mate reminds me they'll be driving a Google car, which can only find locations that have paid Google advertising so that they exist in the virtual world.  I am headed up an abandoned mining 4WD road next week to climb a 14'er.  There will be no cellphone connection.  After a decade of infatuation I find I no longer use email or internet on a cellphone, and increasingly do not talk on it.  When I'm not at home I do not have time to check and adjust devices at home.  When I am at home, I do not have time to wait for security updates before I power on and use my microwave oven. 

 

I was discussing repair of a 1995 model car with a mechanic the other day and he pointed out you still see cars running from the 1920s, 30s, ... up through 70s.  But not the 80s.  Why?  Because of the computers.  Not supported and not repairable.  A car you can throw away if it gets too annoying, but your house?  I propose we veto the IoT.

alex_m1
User Rank
CEO
IBM chip
alex_m1   6/25/2014 10:30:49 AM
NO RATINGS
There's this IBM FPGA for text analysis[1] , which is probably the basis for the IBM chip. It gives 320X improvement over a cpu, but it uses a $12K fpga, hence the asic.

Top Comments of the Week
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.
Flash Poll