Breaking News
Blog

Marketing Insights: When Engineers Say One Thing But Do Another

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 4   >   >>
technos
User Rank
Rookie
Re: It's two different areas
technos   7/3/2014 7:57:42 AM
This is my point exactly. I much rather not jerk some salesman around about their product because I happen to want to read their datasheet. If your datasheet or whitepaper requires that I have to fill in multiple fields, the chances are excellent that I will walk away. As I most likely do not need their product immediately.

But on the other hand, if I can download a datasheet and save it to my hard drive, it is there for when I really do need to consider your product, and the chances are good that I might would use uit.

So, in my case, the lead forms prevent sales, while quick access to the data sheets is just the opposite.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
Re: Lead forms
Bert22306   7/2/2014 8:24:02 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm also with you on the online forms, David. When they get too long, I cancel out.

For the most part, if "lead forms" are forms where you're meant to sign up for an everlasting stream of updates from some particular vendor, I'd almost certainly not do so. If it's just a one time thing, that's different.

For the long term, I'd much rather go search out the information myself. It would be surprising to me if people in general, never mind engineers, didn't feel the same way.

Frank Tu
User Rank
Manager
Why Sling Mud?
Frank Tu   7/2/2014 8:22:11 PM
NO RATINGS
I am dismayed that articles like this are encouraged and the recent "Business for Engineers: Marketers Lie", that want to polarize engineers and marketers and act like one is better than the other.  Next maybe we can trash the bankers - and then the customers and consumers.  It's bad enough that we have to listen to Max tell us daily about his sprouts and other non-sense. 

Yes, you go to EELive and by signing up you apparently give every company that buys a booth or sends a speaker permission to send you sales material, good and bad.  This article seems to just want to say "ha, ha, we tricked you engineers into giving marketers your info by handing out business cards".

Why not stick to real electronics and business issues.  It's clear that EEtimes is just trying to whip up reader involvement with comments.  Stick to real information, real issues, fair comparisons, and real solutions.  Skip the tabloid garbage and get back to being a professional industry periodical. 

David Ashton
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Lead forms
David Ashton   7/2/2014 8:18:12 PM
NO RATINGS
@Elizabeth...passwords.....I tend to use a basic one for things like info sites (manufacturers etc) that hackers would not want to impersonate you on.   For sites where I want to be more secure I use the same password with either a date-related suffix (if it has to or should be changed regularly) or else something related to the site as a suffix.  Tha way I don't have tooo much to remember, and if I get into something where my basic password does not work, I can usually guess at what I used.

Probably not the most secure way to do things, but it has worked most of the time.  My email account did get hacked a few years ago, since then I converted that password to one of the "change regularly" schemes. 

I did get tripped up recently, I changed my date-related suffix to something including a $ character, but my bank won't accept $ characters.   GRRRRRR....

David Ashton
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Lead forms
David Ashton   7/2/2014 8:11:30 PM
NO RATINGS
That went down like a lead balloon :-)

betajet
User Rank
CEO
Re: Lead forms
betajet   7/2/2014 8:07:21 PM
NO RATINGS
Elizabeth wrote: I also don't give out my cell phone number except to people I really want to talk to.  Fortunately I still have a landline phone number that I can give out (not that I'll  answer the phone unless it's my mom).

So, should we to conclude from this that you didn't give your cell phone number to your mom?  :-)

betajet
User Rank
CEO
Re: Lead forms
betajet   7/2/2014 8:04:03 PM
NO RATINGS
Aren't lead forms prohibited by RoHS?  :-)

TonyTib
User Rank
CEO
It's two different areas
TonyTib   7/2/2014 8:03:42 PM
I, and many other designers, do not like having to register to do basic product research like download data sheets and 3D models.  At this stage, my interest might be very tenuous (something I might use if the right requirements arise) or exploratory (I'm considering a whole bunch of different options), and I don't want to be bothered by any sales dudes.


Also, I'm much less likely to download a "white paper" if it requires registration (unless I'm very interested) - and I'm a bit of a cynic about all that stuff in general.

There's also a difference between handing someone a person card in person, and signing up for a login -- and then having to remember that darned login everytime you need info, GRRR!!!

elizabethsimon
User Rank
CEO
Re: Lead forms
elizabethsimon   7/2/2014 7:30:29 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm with you, there's certain information that I generally don't give out but I don't have a problem registering at a repuitable company. Of course, I've got a special email address that I use for that so all the adverts don't clutter my regular inbox. I also don't give out my cell phone number except to people I really want to talk to. Fortunately I still have a landline phone number that I can give out (not that I 'll  answer the phone unless it's my mom)

The biggest problem with all these registrations is that you have to have a different password for each one and have to remember what was used for each one. The other problem is remembering that I already registered if I haven't visited the site in a while.

 

David Ashton
User Rank
Blogger
Lead forms
David Ashton   7/2/2014 6:15:35 PM
NO RATINGS
I occasionally think I'll enter a competition and the form (on the net or on paper) wants all your personal info down to your grandmother's maiden name.  At this point I hit cancel or use the waste basket.

But registering and signing up to newletters from reputable companies like semi manufacturers (or EET) is a different thing - you get some good info out of it, and they will normally let you easily unsubscribe or change your preferences.  I've never been wary of doing this.

<<   <   Page 3 / 4   >   >>
More Blogs
Samsung is building a 10-story complex in the heart of Silicon Valley that will be home for some of its memory and display researchers and a whole lot of ecosystem efforts.
As Moore’s Law reverses beyond 28nm, consider network-on-chip (NoC). While more and more content in SoC designs is coming from third-party IP providers, interconnect-fabric is one area that is still in transition.
Test your knowledge of that ratio of two powers and the ins and outs of S parameters.
At Black Hat, researchers will point out the weaknesses in everything from the satellites in outer space to the thermostat in your home.
Meet Jibo, a connected personal assistant that aims to be your family’s first robot.
Most Recent Comments
didymus7
 
didymus7
 
pmyg89
 
didymus7
 
didymus7
 
didymus7
 
Measurement.Blues
 
kfield
 
Measurement.Blues
Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
Join our online Radio Show on Friday 11th July starting at 2:00pm Eastern, when EETimes editor of all things fun and interesting, Max Maxfield, and embedded systems expert, Jack Ganssle, will debate as to just what is, and is not, and embedded system.
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Top Comments of the Week