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David Ashton
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Re: Rotary Tools
David Ashton   7/4/2014 5:01:03 AM
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@Sheetal - yes doing stuff yourself saves money and (as my father used to say) "If you want a job done well, do it yourself!"

But it pays to have the right tool for the job, it saves a lot of time  (and swearing) and in extreme cases you can't get the job done without it.

Sheetal.Pandey
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Re: Rotary Tools
Sheetal.Pandey   7/4/2014 2:51:07 AM
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 Yes having drilling gun at home with different beads is quite helpful. You can do so much yourself. We have one from Black and Decker. Very satisfied. In India the regular way is to call a carpenter or electrician if you want to get any of these things done. Because labor is very cheap. But now they are either not available or they do poor job so better do it yourself. And after home depos coming in here, its so much fun to set things yourself.

zeeglen
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Re: Rotary Tools
zeeglen   7/3/2014 6:56:09 PM
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@David  Sounds like a spade bit, but finer so it does not cut so deep.

It had a small drill bit centered inside a hollow cylinder with 4 teeth around the circumference, so like a hole saw it cut out a circle in the copper.  Depth was only enough to remove the copper plane and leave an isolated copper island with a hole in the middle for component leads.   Worked great in a Dremel.

Tried to find a link, no luck.  Used them 25 years ago so maybe they are not made anymore.  I think they were called 'drill mills', a google search turns up a lot of drill mills but nothing like this particular bit.

David Ashton
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Re: 256 Holes
David Ashton   7/3/2014 6:18:27 PM
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@Max... "9/16" for the Fresnel lenses"

That's almost half an inch, so not as difficult as finer work.

I'd still go with the centre punch and small drill to start - even go thru 3 drills.

One trick that might work here is to use a piece of veroboard (stripboard, perfboard) as a guide.  Use a first drill that's the same size as the stripboard holes - 1 mm or so.  You can then just manually mark the first hole in the right place, drill a small hole and then  use a fairly thick piece of wire - or another  drill - to get the stripboard aligned with  the first hole.    Then use the stripboard - which you will have pre-marked with a felt tip pen - to drill small holes precisely spaced.  For your matrix you will have to move the stripboard a few times, but locate it in the previously drilled holes and you should be right.  You'll now have a bunch of 1mm holes instead of your centre punch marks.  Use a slightly bigger drill - 1/8 inch maximum - to enlarge the holes before finally drilling them to 9/16.

This technique works really well for LEDs mounted on stripboard - obviously if you use the stripboard for your hole spacing it will be exactly the same as the LED spacing....

Max The Magnificent
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Re: 256 Holes
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 5:14:38 PM
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@David: ...then use the final size drill (you don't say what that is, but I'd assume for 5mm LEDs?

9/16" for the Fresnel lenses

David Ashton
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Re: 256 Holes
David Ashton   7/3/2014 5:04:19 PM
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@Max...if you can't find someone to do it commercially for a reasonable fee then
  1. Mark out VERY carefully with as fine a pen or scriber as you can 
  2. Use a centre punch to start the hole in the right place
  3. Use a small drill (1/16 or smaller) first
  4. Then use the final size drill (you don't say what that is, but I'd assume for 5mm LEDs?

Steps 2/3/4 are the best way to make sure your hole goes where you mark it.

David Ashton
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Re: The size of the chips matters to some
David Ashton   7/3/2014 5:00:06 PM
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@Mongo647... "mostly because I have the punch/die for D-shaped 3/8 hole needed for BNC jacks."

You're a lucky man.  Some switches need a similar hole.  I have always just made a circular hole and used lock washers, but they can come loose.  

David Ashton
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Re: Rotary Tools
David Ashton   7/3/2014 4:56:50 PM
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@Zeeglen.... "Last time I used a nibbling tool it had a squeeze handle. Powered now - cool!"

If you use it with any degree of regularity, get yourself one of the drill attachement ones as shown.  they are magic.  I also have a squeeze one and the powered one is VERY cool in comparison.

> small "hole saws"....

Sounds like a spade bit, but finer so it does not cut so deep.  If you can post a pic or link that would be nice.

David Ashton
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Re: Rotary Tools
David Ashton   7/3/2014 4:53:13 PM
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@TonyTib.... <Sigh> ... so many tools....so little money....

All of these are very tasty.  I think my next purchase is going to be one of the oscillating multi-tools.  The first one offered in Australia was called the Renovator and that's what people tend to call them.   My workmate has one and says they are not as versatile as they are made out to be (on the TV sales channel :-), but he does like it and use it quite a bit.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Rotary Tools
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 4:48:57 PM
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@David: ...I'm even better - I'm ambidextrous...

I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous (I'll bend over backwards to be accomodating :-)

 

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