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antedeluvian
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Interchangeable and flippable drill/drivers
antedeluvian   7/2/2014 6:26:57 PM
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David

 

Great coverage!

I have also seen cordless drills with two chucks that you can swap between by swivelling them round. This is very handy if you want to drill and then drive screws in quick succession because it saves having to swap back and forth between a drill and a screwdriver bit


I am not sure if you are referring to sets like this one or this . They often go together. In the former you can interchange drill bits, screwdriver bits or nut drivers by pulling on the collar of the knurled thing you see on the top right hand side, replacing the bit and ressetting the collar. It is great for quick interchanges even if you have a drill machine with a Jacobs chuck (which most do today).

In the latter this goes one step further bwhere you mount the drill bit on one side and the screwdriver on t'other which you see on the second device from the top. It mounts in the contraption above it and can be pulled out and re-inserted in the opposite direction allowing you to drill a few holes then insert the screws rather conveniently.

There is a third variation where this drill/driver combination is mounted on a pivot so the flipping action is even easier. However, the ones that I used (not the one here) was not quite as robust as I had hoped and I went through 3 of them building my deck. I don't know where the set is now, I thimnk my son has it or I could get a better picture.

A handyman should have all three!

Also, a flexible shaft can be handy.

David Ashton
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Re: Interchangeable and flippable drill/drivers
David Ashton   7/2/2014 8:02:25 PM
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@antedeluvian....thanks....

Hmmm...interesting...I like the set in first link in your post, but I can see that swivel arrangement in your third link would not be too robust.  The thing I was thinking of is like the below - sorry I could not get the pic to post, just the link..  The drill has 2 chucks on a pivot and you turn the whole head to put one of the chucks in the driving position.  Google "dual-drill" and you can get some videos.   I have not heard any reports of this - good or bad - but it looks pretty handy.  I was recently putting up screen mounts for a video conference installation and was successively drilling a hole and screwing in a holding screw - this would have been really handy.

http://www.amazon.com/ALLSTAR-PRODUCT-GROUP-Mansfield-Drill/dp/B000OQ9QTG/ref=cm_cr_pr_pb_i

 

TonyTib
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Rotary Tools
TonyTib   7/2/2014 8:29:27 PM
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Since I don't tend to use power tools a lot, I've been mostly buying corded tools: they give lots of power without having to worry about charging the battery or paying for Lithium batteries.

Dremel is now owned by Bosch, and I'm pretty sure all the Dremels have been made in Mexico for a while.  My current rotary tools is a $20 Harbor Freight variable speed; it's decent quality, but is kind of big.  If I wanted something expensive, I'd get a Proxxon; they're not a whole lot more than Dremels, they're made in Germany, and a friend who does woodworking says they're a lot nicer.

BTW, another way to make holes is to use a milling machine.

 

 

 

David Ashton
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Re: Rotary Tools
David Ashton   7/2/2014 8:45:05 PM
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@TonyTib... "I've been mostly buying corded tools.....My current rotary tools is a $20 Harbor Freight variable speed..."   In my experience you can get a decent corded drill a lot lower down in the market range than a cordless drill.  A decent Cordless drill will be expensive.   but in view of your info about Dremel it might be worth my while to get my old (and I think good quality) Dremel tool fixed.

Milling machines...and lathes....good point.  I have had 2 or 3 friends who have owned both (handy guys to know) and while I would love to have these tools I can't warrant the expense for the amount I would use them.  They are like Microcontrollers - you are limited in what you can do with them only by your imagination.

TonyTib
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Re: Rotary Tools
TonyTib   7/2/2014 9:24:24 PM
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Yes, I'd at least look into getting your old Dremel fixed.  The current ones have plastic cases, and last time I looked on Amazon, a lot of people were unhappy with the quality.

If you can get time, you should do some research into desktop lathes and mills; last time I checked, there were plenty of internet resources, and the Chinese ones are relatively affordable (<$500-$1000).  Of course, they have limited sizes, but a full size one does take up a lot of space.


Also, could you use a scroll saw for making holes?  Another possibility is electric cutout tools.

Since I've used hand nibblers, I like the electric version; another option might be body saws ("designed for cutton car bodies and other metals").

David Ashton
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Re: Rotary Tools
David Ashton   7/2/2014 10:13:31 PM
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@TonyTib....In the old days there was a company called EMCO that used to make the Unimat and Minimat lathes - pretty small, and my friend who had a big one said they were "toys" but they were decent quality and good for small work.  They're no longer made, but you can find second hand ones, they command good prices.  As you say, the chinese stuff has taken over, and some of them are not too bad.

You are right, a scroll saw is a handy thing, especially for unusual shaped holes, as is a jigsaw, and as I do have one of those that was a serious omission.  I've used mine to make neat square holes in wooden cabinets for access to mains and data outlets that would otherwise be hidden.

zeeglen
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Re: Rotary Tools
zeeglen   7/3/2014 10:43:32 AM
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Last time I used a nibbling tool it had a squeeze handle. Powered now - cool!

There was a time when very small "hole saws", with 2 teeth, were used to manually cut about 1/8 inch diameter islands in copperclad pcb material for breadboarding.  Don't know if they are still available.

David Ashton
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Re: Rotary Tools
David Ashton   7/3/2014 4:56:50 PM
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@Zeeglen.... "Last time I used a nibbling tool it had a squeeze handle. Powered now - cool!"

If you use it with any degree of regularity, get yourself one of the drill attachement ones as shown.  they are magic.  I also have a squeeze one and the powered one is VERY cool in comparison.

> small "hole saws"....

Sounds like a spade bit, but finer so it does not cut so deep.  If you can post a pic or link that would be nice.

zeeglen
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Re: Rotary Tools
zeeglen   7/3/2014 6:56:09 PM
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@David  Sounds like a spade bit, but finer so it does not cut so deep.

It had a small drill bit centered inside a hollow cylinder with 4 teeth around the circumference, so like a hole saw it cut out a circle in the copper.  Depth was only enough to remove the copper plane and leave an isolated copper island with a hole in the middle for component leads.   Worked great in a Dremel.

Tried to find a link, no luck.  Used them 25 years ago so maybe they are not made anymore.  I think they were called 'drill mills', a google search turns up a lot of drill mills but nothing like this particular bit.

Sheetal.Pandey
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Re: Rotary Tools
Sheetal.Pandey   7/4/2014 2:51:07 AM
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 Yes having drilling gun at home with different beads is quite helpful. You can do so much yourself. We have one from Black and Decker. Very satisfied. In India the regular way is to call a carpenter or electrician if you want to get any of these things done. Because labor is very cheap. But now they are either not available or they do poor job so better do it yourself. And after home depos coming in here, its so much fun to set things yourself.

David Ashton
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Re: Rotary Tools
David Ashton   7/4/2014 5:01:03 AM
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@Sheetal - yes doing stuff yourself saves money and (as my father used to say) "If you want a job done well, do it yourself!"

But it pays to have the right tool for the job, it saves a lot of time  (and swearing) and in extreme cases you can't get the job done without it.

lakehermit
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Re: Rotary Tools
lakehermit   7/4/2014 2:58:56 PM
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RE the drill bit in a tube, I have a few of these in different sizes. Mine are called pad cutters and are made by a company called Vector. These leave a center hole into which a press fit pin can be installed, the pin having a vertical slot into which leads and wires can be soldered. These are quite inexpensive when you consider the speed at which a breadboard can be constructed to build that one of a kind circuit for some project.

antedeluvian
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Re: Rotary Tools
antedeluvian   7/4/2014 4:01:39 PM
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lakehermit

Mine are called pad cutters and are made by a company called Vector.

Here is the link

Find them at Mouser or Digikey

 

antedeluvian
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Do it yourself pad cutter
antedeluvian   7/4/2014 4:12:45 PM
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Found this whilst searching for pad cutters. The guy calls it a trepanner.

betajet
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Re: Do it yourself pad cutter
betajet   7/4/2014 5:13:00 PM
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Aubrey wrote: The guy calls it a trepanner.

Good name -- it's akin to the tools used for trepanning, the technique of drilling a hole in people's skulls for treating various conditions.  Trepanning goes back to the Neolithic Era.

TonyTib
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Re: Rotary Tools
TonyTib   7/3/2014 4:06:46 PM
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OK, here are some links:

RotoZip (web site is annoying; looks like a mini-plunge router), circle cutting attachment

Electric cut out tool (similar to some of the RotoZips)

Oscillating Mutli-Tool (I have the cheaper one, and it's been much more useful than I expected)

Electric Body Saw

 

David Ashton
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Re: Rotary Tools
David Ashton   7/3/2014 4:53:13 PM
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@TonyTib.... <Sigh> ... so many tools....so little money....

All of these are very tasty.  I think my next purchase is going to be one of the oscillating multi-tools.  The first one offered in Australia was called the Renovator and that's what people tend to call them.   My workmate has one and says they are not as versatile as they are made out to be (on the TV sales channel :-), but he does like it and use it quite a bit.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Rotary Tools
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 11:08:58 AM
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@TonyTib: Since I don't tend to use power tools a lot, I've been mostly buying corded tools: they give lots of power without having to worry about charging the battery or paying for Lithium batteries.

I'm 100% with you on this -- I don't think I have a single battery-operated tool -- it's not that I don't use the tools, but when I do so I'm in my garage, so power isn;t a problem. I guess that if I was on a building site doing thsi every day, I'd be more tempted to use battery-powered versions.

David Ashton
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Re: Rotary Tools
David Ashton   7/3/2014 4:45:29 PM
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@Max... "it's not that I don't use the tools, but when I do so I'm in my garage, so power isn;t a problem."

As soon as you need to make a hole more than about 5 feet away from a power point you either have to find an extension lead or use a cordless tool.  I have a drill and charger hanging on my garage wall, so it's usually the latter, unless it's for a hole in bricks, which my cheap small cordless can't do.  

At work I have to work on vehicles and radio huts and the like, so I have a range of cordless tools including an angle grinder, I would not be without them.

It's very much horses for courses, though,

And I'm pleased to see there is someone else who hits the ; instead of the ' and types things like "isn;t".  My dad once said he had five thumbs on each hand.  I'm even better - I'm ambidextrous - no damn use with either hand :-)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Rotary Tools
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 4:48:57 PM
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@David: ...I'm even better - I'm ambidextrous...

I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous (I'll bend over backwards to be accomodating :-)

 

tom-ii
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Favorite hole-making tools
tom-ii   7/4/2014 9:21:01 AM
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David Ashton
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Re: Favorite hole-making tools
David Ashton   7/6/2014 7:13:51 AM
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@Tom-ii....yes, but they make such untidy holes.... :-)

tom-ii
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Re: Favorite hole-making tools
tom-ii   7/6/2014 8:51:00 AM
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I have a couple of "Rat files" that can make decent work of the ragged edges...

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Favorite hole-making tools
Max The Magnificent   7/7/2014 10:51:55 AM
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@Tom-ii: That is an amazing picture -- is that you?

tom-ii
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Re: Favorite hole-making tools
tom-ii   7/7/2014 11:18:17 AM
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@Max:

 

Yeah, that's me - I have whole series of stuff involving firearms.  That was a lucky shot, but I got about 3 or 4 on that day that are just beautiful.  This is the one I like the most.

 

I even caught the bullet comming down the barrel in a .45 pistol, too!

salbayeng
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Re: Rotary Tools
salbayeng   8/21/2014 1:33:13 AM
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Drilling holes long way from a power outlet....

One of the things I picked up from Harbor freight a decade ago? , was a 2-stroke petrol driven drill, I used it to drill heaps of 1" holes in fenceposts , then having put up a  km of fences , sold the used drill for twice what I paid for it.

antedeluvian
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Adjustable hole saw
antedeluvian   7/3/2014 9:27:33 AM
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David

 I think an adjustable hole saw  (aka circle hole cutter) should be included in the discussion

 

And back to my favourite, Lee Valley, for an adjustable drill bit

And the "oops" arbor just caught my eye

David Ashton
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Re: Adjustable hole saw
David Ashton   7/3/2014 4:38:53 PM
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@antedeluvian...thanks for all the comments...

> I think an adjustable hole saw  (aka circle hole cutter)....

You are very right.  I deliberately omitted it so I would get a comment about it :-)  I have seen ones with a cup over them so the swarf (isn't that a lovely word) won't fly everywhere.

> an adjustable drill bit

Also very neat.  I don't think you could use either of the above for anything harder than wood.  I have a set of spade drill bit which are similar but not adjustable, I was just using them the other day to sink bolt heads into a plank of wood I was mounting on a wall to hold TV screen mounts.

> And the "oops" arbor

Another example of a tool which you wouldn't use very often, but when you need it, very little else will do and it makes the job SO much easier.  The guy who invented that must have fitted a fair few new door locks in his time.....

Max The Magnificent
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Holy Socks!
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 11:09:58 AM
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"Holy Socks, Batman!" said Robin, excitedly.

 

Sorry ... couldn't resist ... take me outside and spank me now :-)

Max The Magnificent
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Tuff Sucker
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 11:10:55 AM
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@David: ... and even a vacuum cleaner called a "Tuff Sucker"

I do like the name "Tuff Sucker," but don't forget the old adage that goes: "Nothing sucks like an Electrolux" :-)



David Ashton
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Re: Tuff Sucker
David Ashton   7/3/2014 4:29:31 PM
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@max...well my Tuff Sucker has not broken, so I guess it is tuff...but it certainly does not suck like an Electrolux.  Once it gets the smallest amount of dust in it, it does not suck very well at all (in fact its sucking sucks, if you see what I mean.... :-)   You then have to take the filter out and wash it.  But in the main the Ryobi One+ tools are great.

Mongo647
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The size of the chips matters to some
Mongo647   7/3/2014 2:35:49 PM
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I don't like to make chips when I make holes, so whenever I can I use either a number 5 jr hand punch (depending on punch and die installed, it makes a hole up to 1/32 over 1/4 inch) or a model XX (up to 1/32 over 1/2 inch hold, again depending on punch and die set installed). Harbor Freight has made cheap copies of both but they are sporadically available, the punch and die sets are not interchangable for the XX copy. Thr original models are currently made by Roper-Whitney, the best current maker of Sheet Metal tools including cutters that cut a 90 degree notch (and other angles) with one squeeze. All these tools are meant for sheet metal, usually flat. The XX is my favorite, mostly because I have the punch/die for D-shaped 3/8 hole needed for BNC jacks. Ebay has the basic punch and bsic set with 7 punch and dies, but it is a little tricky getting other than standard fractional round hole-maker punch and die sets. Quote last year for a replacement D-shaped 3/8 set was $90.

David Ashton
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Re: The size of the chips matters to some
David Ashton   7/3/2014 5:00:06 PM
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@Mongo647... "mostly because I have the punch/die for D-shaped 3/8 hole needed for BNC jacks."

You're a lucky man.  Some switches need a similar hole.  I have always just made a circular hole and used lock washers, but they can come loose.  

Max The Magnificent
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256 Holes
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 4:35:00 PM
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I have to make 256 holes in an 16x16 array in 3/16" thick hardboard for my BADASS Display project. Any suggestions for getting them perfectly aligned?

David Ashton
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Re: 256 Holes
David Ashton   7/3/2014 5:04:19 PM
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@Max...if you can't find someone to do it commercially for a reasonable fee then
  1. Mark out VERY carefully with as fine a pen or scriber as you can 
  2. Use a centre punch to start the hole in the right place
  3. Use a small drill (1/16 or smaller) first
  4. Then use the final size drill (you don't say what that is, but I'd assume for 5mm LEDs?

Steps 2/3/4 are the best way to make sure your hole goes where you mark it.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: 256 Holes
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 5:14:38 PM
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@David: ...then use the final size drill (you don't say what that is, but I'd assume for 5mm LEDs?

9/16" for the Fresnel lenses

David Ashton
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Re: 256 Holes
David Ashton   7/3/2014 6:18:27 PM
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@Max... "9/16" for the Fresnel lenses"

That's almost half an inch, so not as difficult as finer work.

I'd still go with the centre punch and small drill to start - even go thru 3 drills.

One trick that might work here is to use a piece of veroboard (stripboard, perfboard) as a guide.  Use a first drill that's the same size as the stripboard holes - 1 mm or so.  You can then just manually mark the first hole in the right place, drill a small hole and then  use a fairly thick piece of wire - or another  drill - to get the stripboard aligned with  the first hole.    Then use the stripboard - which you will have pre-marked with a felt tip pen - to drill small holes precisely spaced.  For your matrix you will have to move the stripboard a few times, but locate it in the previously drilled holes and you should be right.  You'll now have a bunch of 1mm holes instead of your centre punch marks.  Use a slightly bigger drill - 1/8 inch maximum - to enlarge the holes before finally drilling them to 9/16.

This technique works really well for LEDs mounted on stripboard - obviously if you use the stripboard for your hole spacing it will be exactly the same as the LED spacing....

perl_geek
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Aligning Holes
perl_geek   7/6/2014 10:30:37 AM
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If you aren't already aware of them, you might like to know about Clecos: http://www.rivetsonline.com/cleco.html which are to sheet-metal working what pins are to dress-making. They're a temporary fastener to hold 2 pieces aligned together while they are drilled or riveted.

If you want a lot of holes evenly spaced, an adjustable rivet spacer is a alternative http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/topages/rivspacer.php?clickkey=6495 to a sheet of perf-board, but whether the extra expense is justified would depend on how important regularity and particular spacing is.

Davy.Baker
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Re: 256 Holes
Davy.Baker   7/6/2014 3:09:46 AM
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Day pass at TechShop with laser and/or ShopBot.

ca94002
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Hands on approaches
ca94002   7/4/2014 2:37:07 PM
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Great article - a reminder to the many approaches to making a "Hole in One" or more...

I have four, albeit less elegant, tools for making holes which are useful for some applications.1. LaboratoryHole Drill- originally used to put hole in lab stoppers - they come in a set stacked inside each other like Russian Dolls. For holes in soft materials like palstic - they work great. OK for the one up, low volume projects
2. The Leather Punch - mine has 5 or 6 dies for different size holes -originally belts etc but again thin sheets of rubber or plastic -works great...
3. Whitney Punches - a kit of various punches -  hand punch -quick and easy way to punch even through aluminum sheets...sort of a hand Greenlee
4. Tried and true - the Hand Reamer -for those slight adjustments to the - opps too small hole



All do not require charging before use or power cord!

 

 

David Ashton
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Re: Hands on approaches
David Ashton   7/4/2014 6:51:27 PM
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@ca94002...thanks for that.....I could easily have expanded this to two articles with all the other tools that commenters have given.  I have a leather punch and a hand reamer as you describe, so I should not have forgotten about them.  But then again, if I had covered everything I probably would not have got all these comments!

antedeluvian
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Conecut
antedeluvian   7/7/2014 1:08:35 PM
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David

 

I have a variation on the stepped drill bits you show. They are called cone-cuts and they are exactly that- cones wtihout the steps that you have. It seems to me that the original manufacturer doesn't exist any more, but Here is a similar part or the ones in the middle here.

I actually have two for different hole sizes. The porblem as you might guess is actually drilling out the right diameter. I did see a suggestion of using a washer of the right size (or slightly smaller) fitted over the bit to help stop at the right point.

David Ashton
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Re: Conecut
David Ashton   7/7/2014 6:25:47 PM
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@antedeluvian....I was once looking at my stepped drills and wondering if you had to have the steps, or whther they would work as a cone.  Obviously they do!

Since writing the article and writing this I have used a good few of the tools I mentioned in a videoconference installation at work.  

mhrackin
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One more kind of drill bit
mhrackin   7/7/2014 1:34:17 PM
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I have several REALLY LONG drill bits specifically designed for running cables through walls etc. Diameter ranges from 3/8 to 1 inch, with length about 60 inches.  Shanks are designed to have some flexibility and also have holes for pulling a string through after completing the hole.  I use this with (and store with) a set of fiberglass flex rods that screw together to make one 30 feet long.  Great for pulling cables through wiring chases, over suspended ceilings, etc.  I've used these to run both Cat5/6 and coax in several houses (and my office, until management insisted that we had to use licensed electricians for this).  PS: I run a LOOP of string the entire length of the vertical or horizontal run, and use {like pulleys over nails at each end) so I can access the same locations repeatedly to run wires.

David Ashton
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Re: One more kind of drill bit
David Ashton   7/7/2014 6:22:10 PM
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@MHRackin...nice tools, and nice techniques.  You sound like a man who has run a few cables in his time.....

anon3887601
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electric drills
anon3887601   7/8/2014 2:04:55 PM
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Interesting collection David.  I also have many of the gadgets you've shown.

My immediate problem is to find a new electric drill which is NOT made in China.  I have queried many suppliers and manufacturers looking for such and have come up empty.  All of the quality and well-known Japanese brands are made in China, and even Bosch is made in Malaysia.

Help from readers?  Does anyone know of a brand guaranteed to be US or European/Scandanavian made?

Cheers, Wayne

antedeluvian
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Re: electric drills
antedeluvian   7/8/2014 2:35:18 PM
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Wayne

My immediate problem is to find a new electric drill which is NOT made in China. 

I don't know, but if any company does make in the US (based on its name) it would be Milwaukee Tools.

I would also suggest looking at Ridgid Tools

I just found this site for de Walt that claims that they are US build

Which I found on a google search "us made cordless power tools". Seems there may be a few more.

 Elsewhere someone suggested Snap-On

But I think you are going to have to ask them all directly.

 

David Ashton
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Re: electric drills
David Ashton   7/8/2014 4:37:04 PM
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@Wayne..."to find a new electric drill which is NOT made in China."

Good luck with that.  I'll be interested to see if anyone does come up with anything.

PS...Just read Antedeluvian's reply.  I have a couple of fairly recent De Walt tools at work, I'll check them.

And I think someone else might have some Milwaukee ones, if I find any I'll check them too.

David Ashton
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Re: electric drills
David Ashton   7/9/2014 12:25:05 AM
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@Wayne....I'm now at work and checked my DeWalt drill (which is a couple of years old now).  The Drill itself is made in Mexico.  The battery pack is assembled in Taiwan with cells made in Japan.   The charger says it's assembled in Thailand.  So there you have it....  The case does not say where it is made, but maybe they put all the parts into the case in the USA :-)   I will say though that it is a very powerful and sturdy drill with most of the features I want. 

A friend I talked to said he thinks Milwaukee tools are still made in the States but cannot confirm it, I will keep trying there.

anon3887601
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drills
anon3887601   7/9/2014 3:16:45 PM
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Hello everyone

Many thanks for the responses but I have no luck as yet.  ALL of the manufacturers mentioned including DeWalt, Milwaukee, Ryobi etc told me by e-mail they manufacture their products in China.  Milwaukee only manufactures their large drills (1/2" and bigger) in the USA.  DeWalt assembles "some models" of cordless drills in the USA "using global components" which means Chinese parts.

What precipitated this adventure is my 35-year old Black and Decker, which is still working perfectly but the trigger switch fell apart.  And of course spare parts for those are now extinct.

I'd pay happily for a nice German or Swiss made electric drill but if such exists it probably wouldn't work on the voltage here in the US.  Even the Bosch products I see in the store are made in the far east.

Sigh.  So few manufacturers care about quality any more, it is all about high volumes for the cheapest price.  Show me any current product that will last 35+ years like my old B&D and you can have my first born child.

Cheers, Wayne

 

David Ashton
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Re: drills
David Ashton   7/9/2014 6:10:40 PM
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Hi Wayne.  Sorry we can't satisfy your patriotism!  But go into a store and have a look at DeWalt - I am really impressed by the quality of the one I have.  It has an aluminium body, not plastic, and gives the appearance of being built "like a brick outhouse".   Of course I have only had it for a couple of years now and I don't know if it will last 35 years.   But then you gain features as well when you get a new one.  

BTW I did a story recently about fixing a Black and Decker here if you didn't see it...

PS I never wanted kids...so your offer of your first born has me gasping thankfully that I didn't find a "Made in USA" drill for you :-)

TonyTib
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Re: drills
TonyTib   7/10/2014 12:51:50 PM
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It looks like not everything is made in China; for example, on Amazon I found a German made Bosch drill (for >$400) and a German made Fein drill (>$800).  I believe that Proxxon rotary tools are still made in Germany, but they're not drills.


BTW, just about everything is "globally sourced", including a lot of stuff that's "Made In China".  For example, most memory (DRAM, flash) isn't made in China.

Also off topic: my vacuum is a German-made Bosch canister vac.  The price was reasonable (unlike Miele and some others).  It's 8 years old and still going strong; the Dyson canister vac was more expensive, made in Malasia, and had a lot of quality complaints.

TonyTib
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Re: drills
TonyTib   7/10/2014 12:59:01 PM
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Also, another option is to look on eBay for a working used drill of the same or similar model, for one to salvage for parts, or for the broken part.  It's a long shot, but worth trying.

 

 

TonyTib
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Re: drills
TonyTib   7/15/2014 2:30:44 PM
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I spent some time this past weekend at my local Ace and Lowe's hardware.  If you're looking for a drill Made In USA, you're out of luck.  If you're looking for one not made in China, there are some options.

At Ace, I found a large Milwaukee made in the Czech republic, and some other drills (DeWalt IIRC) made in Mexico.

At Lowe's, I found a large, expensive ($400) Bosch made in Germany (interestingly, a much more affordable Bosch jig saw was made in Switzerland).  A lot of the DeWalts were made in Mexico, and IIRC, another Bosch was made in Malaysia.

As far as the coordless drills go, some of the DeWalts were made in Mexico.

 

aktif3123
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Re: drills
aktif3123   7/21/2014 7:35:20 AM
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another nickname
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Kind of limited article
another nickname   7/10/2014 3:53:33 PM
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I use a bit wider variety of tools to make holes.

Most of the time, it's just a nail and a hammer . It's the breakable medium (e.g. glass) when you have to get creative. Microtorch (and anything combustible) gets me excited easily but I couldn't use it as much as I'd like to. Old soldering iron could be used to make holes in PVCs - of course, you wouldn't use the tip directly, you would wrap metal wire of needed diameter on it . And then there are chemicals - lovely sulfuric acid made more holes in my clothes than in the objects of my experiments.

David Ashton
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Re: Kind of limited article
David Ashton   7/10/2014 4:46:15 PM
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@Another - this article could have been 3 or 4 times the size it is and I still would not have covered all possible ways of making holes.  

So how WOULD you make a hole in glass?  As I recall there are special drill bits for that??

another nickname
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Re: Kind of limited article
another nickname   7/12/2014 8:41:43 PM
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That was my point - the article's title is "How to make holes in things" and all we're talking is different drils and drill bits. Yes, you would use diamond bits to drill the glass. The challenge would be to make holes without drilling - wake up your inner McGyver.

 

David Ashton
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Re: Kind of limited article
David Ashton   7/12/2014 9:28:55 PM
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@Another - fair point - but as I said the article could have been far bigger and still not covered everything.  Yes most of the tools were rotary, if not different types of drill directly, and maybe I should have cast my net a bit wider.     Can I suggest you get onto Max and send him an article "Making holes without drills" - he's always on teh lookout for interesting stuff....

Crusty1
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Nibblers
Crusty1   7/12/2014 4:54:58 AM
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Hi David,

Nibblers for aluminium sheet of up to 1mm thickness I had a lovely hand operated nibbler, sadly it passed away, through my own fault of presenting it with too much to nibble.

Problem is I have never been able to find another, Its not always useful to have a drill driven one.

Car boots and second hand tool shops have never turned up another for me. If any reader knows wherethe are still obtainable then you would get a big thanks from Crusty.

Nibblers are great for square holes.

 

David Ashton
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Re: Nibblers
David Ashton   7/12/2014 5:21:30 AM
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Hi Crusty..  Don'tcha hate it when one of your tools passes on to tool heaven and you can't find another one?  I will keep my eyes open and let you know if I find one..   I can thoroughly recommend the drill-accessory ones but I see your point, my hand one is also more suited to square holes, though it is going the way of yours I fear.....

David Ashton
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Re: Nibblers
David Ashton   7/12/2014 5:28:59 AM
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@Crusty I found the following at Element 14 (Farnell) but (a) none of them look like mine and (b) the prices are likely to give you a sharp intake of breath.....(as E14 prices are wont to do :-)

http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/search/results.jsp?N=0&Ntk=gensearch&Ntt=nibbler&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&suggestions=false&ref=globalsearch&_requestid=61574

David Ashton
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Re: Nibblers
David Ashton   7/12/2014 6:02:35 AM
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Crusty...have a look at this one I found on Ebay, it is identical to the one I have:

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Hand-Nibbler-Sheet-Metal-Cutting-Tool-NEW-/270996948066?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f18ad4462&_uhb=1



US$ 30 plus nearly 50 postage.  Also sharp intake of breath material.....

Crusty1
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Re: Nibblers
Crusty1   7/12/2014 6:13:14 AM
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Hi David: That's the type I had and they rearly do work work, especially from inside the box outward.

I will now see how the budget is after buying all those bits of electronic frippery that a man in the know just has to have.

Cheers

Crusty

David Ashton
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Re: Nibblers
David Ashton   7/12/2014 6:24:50 AM
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Hi Crusty.  That type is good.  Contact the seller and see if you can negotiate a bit on the postage - bear in mind the figure I gave would have been to Australia, it might be cheaper to the UK.  You may find others - I think I searched on "hand nibbler" to find that one, but try "nibbling cuttter" and other such search terms.  There are some very tasty purpose built electric ones out there as well, which is why I tried including "Hand" in it.   Good luck....

Crusty1
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Re: Nibblers
Crusty1   7/12/2014 6:29:05 AM
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Hi David I looked at the UK postage and the cost is still eye watering.

Will see if Chronos a very good UK tool company is interested in getting these in.

Best

salbayeng
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Re: Nibblers
salbayeng   8/21/2014 1:17:47 AM
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Aha, Saw this about a year ago in a  Jaycar ad placed in nuts and volts , the price was $30 US.

Thought I'd get it cheaper over here (Oz)  , but no...  ~$60 for us locals

http://jaycar.com.au/productResults.asp?whichpage=1&pagesize=10&w=nibbler&form=KEYWORD

But,  For you lucky US folK

http://www.jaycar.us/productResults.asp?w=nibbler&keyform=KEYWORD&SUBMIT=Search

Reminds me of the time I went to a great deal of trouble to carry a $20 bottle of excellent Hunter Valley chardonney all the way across the pond to friends in Buffalo, only to find the exact same wine in a bottleshop on NF Boulevarde for $10 .. 

 

David Ashton
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Re: Nibblers
David Ashton   8/21/2014 3:02:23 AM
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@Salbayeng...Cheaper in Oz?  you must be joking.

This is where I got mine, and yes it is $60...but good value I reckon all the same:

http://www.toolking.com.au/products/NIBBLER-Ranger-pro.html

re Jaycar...see my complaints about their meter prices in Max's blog on tools:

http://www.eetimes.com/author.asp?section_id=216&doc_id=1323332

About 2/3 way down, I give a comparison between US / OZ prices...from the same company.  As they say here in Oz....it's full 6u115h1t mate!

kfield
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Another Thing to Make Holes
kfield   7/14/2014 4:45:48 PM
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@Davidashton The title of your article reminded me of the day we did the inspection on the home we bought 12 years ago: There was a fist-sized hole in a wall that had not been there when we had originally looked at the house. We weren't sure what the story was, notwithstanding that the owner looked like the type that could put his hand through a wall, so we were quite happy that he agreed to pay for the repair with no argument. 

David Ashton
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
David Ashton   7/14/2014 6:42:32 PM
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@Karen...I took all the doorstops off our house 'cos they impeded the movement of my wife's wheelchair.  But I opened my ofice door a bit too eagerly one day and I now have a doorknob-shaped hole in the wall that needs fixing.   One of those things I need a round tuit for.....

Oh for my old Zimbabwe Double-Brick house.  They are indestructible, nearly....

elizabethsimon
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
elizabethsimon   7/14/2014 7:23:57 PM
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I seem to remember seeing some flat round plastic protectors that you could get. Do an internet search for "Doorknob wall protector" You might be able to use one to patch the wall and protect from further damage at the same time. Of course, you'd have to find them where you live....

 

David Ashton
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
David Ashton   7/14/2014 7:29:53 PM
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Thanks Elizabeth.  Rather than removing the doorstops I should have just shortened them so they stopped the door about 1/8 inch from the wall.  Previously it was around an inch and a bit.  But your suggestion gives me an idea - use the hole to get a strip of wood at the back of the hole, and screw a round wooden bit to it over the hole.  Now all I need is to get a round tuit.....

kfield
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
kfield   7/14/2014 9:27:20 PM
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@davidashton LOL! My sister has a hole in her wall faintly resembling a foot where her husband kicked through the wall after flying off the back of a treadmill. Fortunately he wasn't hurt, except for his wounded pride!

David Ashton
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
David Ashton   7/14/2014 10:45:55 PM
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@Karen that sounds like something you normally see in Funniest Home Videos.  I don't suppose there was a camera there?

antedeluvian
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
antedeluvian   7/15/2014 1:41:22 AM
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David, Karen

There is a Candian humourist who writes about the misadventures of a Canadian family. Father of the family is named Dave, and there was a really funny story about Dave and a treadmill. You can read the story here, or listen to it somewhere on this podcast. You may have trouble downloading it, maybe for copyright reasons. I am currently in Eurpoe and am having trouble downloading it to narrow down where the story starts. I do find it funnier hearing it, rather than reading it.

David Ashton
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
David Ashton   7/15/2014 5:45:04 AM
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@Antedeluvian...that sort of thing would happen to me.  IF I was foolish enough to get on a treadmill.  Managed to resist them so far... :-)

kfield
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
kfield   7/15/2014 10:16:36 AM
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@DavidAston Though he wasn't screwing around, the result was more like the show Jack***. No videos, unfortunately. Here's an even better story: A friend of mine was at a gym and saw a runner fly off the back of a treadmill. The friend went over to turn off the treadmill and stepped onto the belt to do so. Guess what? Now a pile of guys at the back of the treadmill!

David Ashton
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
David Ashton   7/15/2014 4:43:27 PM
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@Karen it gets funnier and funnier... :-)

salbayeng
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Making big holes with a small drill
salbayeng   8/21/2014 1:03:19 AM
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This is actually true and happened at a previous workplace. 

An electrician was drilling a 1/4Hole througha 1/8" steel wall to mount a cable tray or something.

All was going well until BOOM - FLASH suddenly a ragged 1" charred hole appeared, he had neglected to check on the position of the 415v 3ph feeder on the other side, fortunately the worker was not permanently injured.

 

Actually my favorite hole making tool is a (hand-held) plasma cutter, you can carve any shaped hole including slots, curved holes , half holes, and also cut through welds without damaging the metal on either side. Pity it only cuts metal (and strategically misplaced leather gloves and thumbnails...ouch).

salbayeng
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
salbayeng   8/21/2014 1:06:13 AM
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@ David

re " Oh for my old Zimbabwe Double-Brick house.  They are indestructible, nearly..."

I imagine a rhinocerous would make a decent size hole in such a wall?

David Ashton
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Re: Another Thing to Make Holes
David Ashton   8/21/2014 2:55:36 AM
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@Salbayeng... "I imagine a rhinocerous would make a decent size hole in such a wall?"

Well yes, but where I lived there were not too many of them nearby.  One place I lived we did get Kudu (large antelope with spiral horns) eating our roses at night, but nothing worse than that,    Elephants have been known to demolish stuctures that are not too well built by rubbing their backsides against them to get a good scratch.  But most animals are too clever (and shy) to try this sort of thing....

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