Breaking News
Blog

The Coming Revolution in Desktop Pick-and-Place Machines

NO RATINGS
1 saves
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
AJ2X
User Rank
Author
Re: The world is changing... Again
AJ2X   8/7/2014 9:47:57 AM
NO RATINGS
My first thought when reading the headline for this piece was, "excellent!"  My next thought was, "but what a hobbyist really needs is a way to solder those placed components."  Surface mount parts can be difficult to place, but even my 66-year-old eyes can do it (with a nice big magnifier).  Where I work we only recently switched from all hand placing and soldering SMT parts when the volumes got over a few hundred boards/year.  The passives and SOIC parts were no real problem but now too many ICs only come in BGA and other forms not hand-solderable.

But the Squink system promises to solve that, as I learned by reading further.  That's quite exciting.  I wonder what sort of current-handling capacity that conductive ink and epoxy has, though, and how it behaves over temperature.  Such a device should be quite valuable for prototyping by companies of all sizes, as well as hobbyists.

krisi
User Rank
Author
Re: The world is changing... Again
krisi   8/4/2014 11:12:43 AM
NO RATINGS
thank you @Duane...I understand hobbyists...but that is a very small market...I am wondering whether there is more widespread application of this technology

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
Re: The world is changing... Again
Max The Magnificent   8/2/2014 1:55:16 PM
NO RATINGS
@CarlosOs: We do use computer vision to align and correct placement.

Hi Carlos -- I'm Max -- one of the editors here at EE Times -- can you keep me informed as to any developments with Squink, including when you eventually make it available with multi-layer support (my email is max.maxfield@ubm.com)

Duane Benson
User Rank
Author
Re: The world is changing... Again
Duane Benson   8/2/2014 1:37:17 PM
NO RATINGS
Wb2mjg - It is possible for a hobbyist to hand place a lot of components. One of our customers, a while back, told me that he and his engineer buddies used to have contests to see who could hand solder the smallest component.

He was able to hand solder 01005 passive parts. That's pretty amazing. The reason companies like mine and this emerging desktop PnP machines have a place is that it's hard to do that. Not everybody can, and not everyone enjoys it.

It's a bit like auto mechanics. The tools are around such that just about anyone, theoretically, could repair their car. Most don't, though.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Author
Re: The world is changing... Again
Duane Benson   8/2/2014 1:31:13 PM
NO RATINGS
Krisi - The contrast: "more time than money" vs. "more money than time" is a big factor in the future of this sort of thing. Today, there are a lot of hobbyists and makers that simply don't have access to machine assembly.

They might be able to carefully do it by hand, but that's pretty limiting. These desk-top pick and place machines will helpe considerably. I work for a place that is very proud of our service and abilities in the pro world. A lot of people simply can't afford to pay for the expertize of a professional. Desktop PnP machines may very well be the answer for those folks.

CarlosOs
User Rank
Author
Re: The world is changing... Again
CarlosOs   8/2/2014 10:48:36 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm Carlos and I work at BotFactory. Your comment about computer vision made me realize that our kickstarter page is not clear about it. check this: 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/botfactory/squink-the-personal-electronic-circuit-factory/posts

We do use computer vision to align and correct placement.

We are indeed working in multi-layer and we're making progress really fast. The good news is that the machine will most-likely stay unaltered, so you would only need to get new consumables.

Thanks for your comment, and thanks to EETimes for metioning us.

 

wb2mjg
User Rank
Author
Re: The world is changing... Again
wb2mjg   8/2/2014 8:32:03 AM
NO RATINGS
I like the Squink idea a lot, except for the pic and place idea. Making PC boards with conductive epoxy put down as well is super, but pick and place requires a vision system and additional capabilities not needed in "mere" print heads. I believe the home hobbyist can easily put a chip or SMD in place on conductive epoxy manually using his internal vision system!

Instead of pic and place, how about adding the ability to deposit insulating layers to build up multi-level PCBs??

krisi
User Rank
Author
Re: The world is changing... Again
krisi   8/1/2014 5:29:44 PM
NO RATINGS
do you expect those pick and place machines to find widespread applications for small companies?

Duane Benson
User Rank
Author
The world is changing... Again
Duane Benson   8/1/2014 4:08:19 PM
NO RATINGS
I'd say that desktop pick and place machines are about where 3D printers were about five years ago. I think the pick and place will come in faster though, since many of the problems were solved with 3D printers.

Most Recent Comments
michigan0
 
SteveHarris0
 
realjjj
 
SteveHarris0
 
SteveHarris0
 
VicVat
 
Les_Slater
 
SSDWEM
 
witeken
Most Recent Messages
9/25/2016
4:48:30 PM
michigan0 Sang Kim First, 28nm bulk is in volume manufacturing for several years by the major semiconductor companies but not 28nm FDSOI today yet. Why not? Simply because unlike 28nm bulk the LDD(Lightly Doped Drain) to minimize hot carrier generation can't be implemented in 28nm FDSOI. Furthermore, hot carrier reliability becomes worse with scaling, That is the major reason why 28nm FDSOI is not manufacturable today and will not be. Second, how can you suppress the leakage currents from such ultra short 7nm due to the short channel effects? How thin SOI thickness is required to prevent punch-through of un-dopped 7nm FDSOI? Possibly less than 4nm. Depositing such an ultra thin film less then 4nm filum uniformly and reliably over 12" wafers at the manufacturing line is extremely difficult or not even manufacturable. If not manufacturable, the 7nm FDSOI debate is over!Third, what happens when hot carriers are generated near the drain at normal operation of 7nm FDSOI? Electrons go to the positively biased drain with no harm but where the holes to go? The holes can't go to the substrate because of the thin BOX layer. Some holes may become trapped at the BOX layer causing Vt shift. However, the vast majority of holes drift through the the un-dopped SOI channel toward the N+Source,...

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed