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BlackBerry Comeback Far From Certain

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rtapl123
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Re: Practical lighting, not additive color theory
rtapl123   10/15/2014 5:15:51 PM
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What about the laser diode?

betajet
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Re: Practical lighting, not additive color theory
betajet   10/15/2014 3:04:39 PM
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rtapl asked: Is the invention of the red LED really a big deal compared to the invention of the blue which has enabled a total revolution in lighting?

IMO, yes.  I sincerely doubt anyone would have been looking for a blue LED if the other colors (plus infrared) hadn't happened first.  I remember the 1980's when a practical blue LED was a "holy grail" that was finally available in 1989, using carborundum.

rtapl123
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Re: Practical lighting, not additive color theory
rtapl123   10/15/2014 2:35:08 PM
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Is the invention of the red LED really a big deal compared to the invention of the blue which has enabled a total revolution in lighting?

prabhakar_deosthali
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Re: Practical lighting, not additive color theory
prabhakar_deosthali   10/12/2014 2:58:46 AM
I am also  of the opinion that , the invention of Blue LED is not something that original as to get a Nobel Prize.

The inventors of LED per say deserve this prize.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Practical lighting, not additive color theory
junko.yoshida   10/9/2014 7:40:50 AM
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@prabhakar, I do see some technical glitches on this thread on our CMS. Let us work with our IT team. Meanwhile, our readers who want to comment on this John Walko's piece, could still do so on this thread.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Practical lighting, not additive color theory
junko.yoshida   10/9/2014 7:36:57 AM
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@AZskibum, I am in total agreement. Yes, the Nobel Committee, as you have suggested, should have said the invention of "white (blue) LED."

prabhakar_deosthali
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Re: Practical lighting, not additive color theory
prabhakar_deosthali   10/9/2014 7:17:29 AM
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AZskibum
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Practical lighting, not additive color theory
AZskibum   10/9/2014 6:32:06 AM
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I keep seeing these references to the blue LED merely providing the last additive primary color needed to make white light:

"Their contribution to the visible LED technology completed the triad of the colors — red, green and blue — needed to produce white light."

While it is true that some manufacturers offer tri-color LED packages that allow for mixing -- to produce any color you want, including white -- this is not the innovation that is transforming conventional lighting applications and replacing older, less efficient lighting technologies. That innovation truly is the blue LED, combined with the chemical coating often referred to (somewhat incorrectly) as the "phosphor" that transforms the blue light into a broad spectrum that nicely approximates white light.

The fact that energy-efficient LED lighting does not need or use red or green LEDs should suggest, even to a layman, that there is something different, and an innovation that was difficult and somewhat revolutionary, about the blue LED.

Perhaps the Nobel committee should've given the prize to the inventors of the "white (blue) LED."

 

 

Some Guy
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Not Dead Yet ...
Some Guy   8/11/2014 3:02:50 PM
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"Yet" being the operative term, IMHO. The Enterprise Smart Phone was BlackBerry's to lose. They snatched defeat from the jaws of victory by ignoring the iPhone, and I just don't see how they ever get back from a way of thinking at the top that disregards the end-user. The same folks that lead you into disaster aren't the ones to lead you out.

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