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For a Hardware Startup, Version 2.0 Is 'Made in America'

Karen Field
9/9/2014 11:25 AM EDT

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Susan Rambo
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Re: 3D printing jobs
Susan Rambo   9/15/2014 2:07:43 PM
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I like the frankenfactory concept and that all the body parts are in the US. Thanks!

lisafetterman
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Re: 3D printing jobs
lisafetterman   9/15/2014 2:03:20 PM
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Hey Susan,


We're making a frakenfactory where we source our tooling from a factory in the United States and bring it all back to the Bay Area for assembly.

 

kfield
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Re: Version 2.0 Is 'Made in America'
kfield   9/12/2014 3:15:00 PM
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Some great questions - I've asked Lisa Fetterman, the CEO, to weigh in.

docdivakar
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Re: Version 2.0 Is 'Made in America'
docdivakar   9/12/2014 1:38:02 PM
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I have a few points to differ with in this article. First of all, CNC'ing metal parts vs. 3D printing plastic or powder metallurgy-based materials are completely different things and each have their own advantages. With a 3D CAD model of the part, generating the CNC machine readable G-codes is quite straight forward and does not consume as much time as it used to in yesteryears with 2D drawing & tool path generation. With good tooling operations, everything can be setup on the CNC machine including removing metal burrs (deburring). These result in part cost about 10 to 15% above material costs in volumes. Using large size material blanks (depending on the part dimensions), one can machine multiple parts in one setup. Any day, I would prefer CNC-machined part over "3D printed" ones for part reliability and performance. So the statement on CNC'ing one part in China cost as much as $300 may not be telling the whole story. Or they could have gone to a machine shop named "Inability to Express" and might have incurred unnecessary expenses!

I am happy to note that the company chose Oakland, CA over other places in the US (sorry Texans!). Besides these feel good vibes initially, what I would really like to know is how the company going to source its finished goods in the longer run when volumes pickup.

MP Divakar

Susan Rambo
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3D printing jobs
Susan Rambo   9/9/2014 3:44:37 PM
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Good story. I enjoyed reading it. It's amazing what 3D printing can do. I see they made the prototype here at the 3D printing house in Oakland,  but they claim to be manufacturing it in the US, too. Where and how will they manufacture the actual product?

kfield
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Re: Question on caption
kfield   9/9/2014 2:56:39 PM
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OOps, I didn't realize the name couldn't be read in the photo:

 

"Inability to Express Hardware Appliance Company Ltd"

cd2012
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Question on caption
cd2012   9/9/2014 2:27:56 PM
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So, what's the name of the Chinese company that cracks Ms. Fetterman up?

pconti
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thanks
pconti   9/9/2014 2:23:05 PM
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Made in the USA=Jobs in the USA

THANK YOU

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