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Inside Intel's Gen 8 GPU

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jonpeddie
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Re: price
jonpeddie   9/30/2014 7:05:42 PM
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I'lll take your word on that, but this part is going into tablets with a selling price in China of $200-$400 max. The i7, which is based on the same architecture sells for $200+ so maybe who ever wrote the story you saw got that mixed up. 

The main take-away here is Intel is in the mobile game in a big way. The CEO's forcast of Intel being in 40m tablets by the end of this calendar year is likely to be exceeded. Intel is going to beat its guidence for Q3, and probably Q4 too. 

capaciton
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Re: price
capaciton   9/30/2014 6:25:12 PM
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PC CPUs have a wide price range going over $1000 at the upper end. Most are between $100-$200.

alex_m1
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Re: price
alex_m1   9/24/2014 4:16:49 AM
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Jon, i can't link due to some eetimes issue, but search for "Intel Core M Puts PC Back on Map" on eetimes, there $281 price is quoted.

jonpeddie
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Re: price
jonpeddie   9/24/2014 1:39:42 AM
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? ?  I don't know where the $280 price cam from but most PC CPUs don't cost that much. I don't know the exact price but I'd guess it to be <$25. Maybe it was a typo.

alex_m1
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Re: I suspect this is ultimately about mobile.
alex_m1   9/23/2014 3:33:10 AM
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@DMcCunney : but intel did claim that it's 14nm process preserves moore's law with regards to price. So on cost per transistor they should be around half the price of 14nm. But it's not reflected in final prices. So either that inte choose to targeted the highest end(and get low volumes) , which is weird , or there's some other reason preventing them from pricing competitively. And that reason is interesting.

DMcCunney
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Re: I suspect this is ultimately about mobile.
DMcCunney   9/22/2014 10:13:31 PM
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@alex_n1: And intel also claims leadership in chip manufacturing cost with the 14nm process .So why aren't we seeing competitively priced products ?

Define "competively priced".

The problem is that costs get exponentially higher as process geometries shrink.  Intel may be a leader in 14nm process manufacture, but that's all relative, and the difference may be between "really expensive" and "hideously expensive."

Meanwhile, the Tegra K1 is at the 28nm level, so Intel's leadership at 14nm isn't a factor.

I expect Intel pricing on products derived from this effort to be a lot more competitive.

alex_m1
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Re: I suspect this is ultimately about mobile.
alex_m1   9/22/2014 6:53:07 PM
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Lookin a bit deeper into it , it appears that the core M offer only 40-50% graphics improvement over the tegra-k1 processor which is another new tablet chip. The core-m costs $280. On the other hand , acer released a chromebook 13 that uses the tegra k1 , in which the whole laptop costs $280. That probably means that the tegra costs around $100.

And intel also claims leadership in chip manufacturing cost with the 14nm process .So why aren't we seeing competitively priced products ?

 

DMcCunney
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I suspect this is ultimately about mobile.
DMcCunney   9/22/2014 6:28:14 PM
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I'm fascinated.

I recently got a new desktop machine that came with Intel oboard graphics on the motherboard.  One of the things I did was get a PCI-e graphics card to replace the onboard video, because Intel's 3D performance has always been poor.  I'm not a heavy gamer, so I didn't need the raw blazing power and gobs of onboard static RAM featured in the latest Nvidia and AMD-ATI offerings, so an older ATI card fit the bill at a low price point.  It does what I need to do, and things like Google Earth are much improved,

But given Intel's technical ability, I wondered off and on why Intel didn't make better offerings.  They certainly have the ability. My assumption was their view of their business: they make CPUs and supporting chips that OEMs can buiild into motherboards.  That's where the market and the money is.  They'll add graphics and sound to provide the basics, but assume that for needs beyond the basics, manufacturers or users will install more powerful third-party products.

High end video is a niche market with relatively low volumes.  Intel would be unlikely to sell enough higher end graphics chips to justify producing them.  They're in a business where volume matters, and they have to potentially sell a lot of something to justify tooling up to make it.

The fact that they are quietly changing direction is interesting.  I don't expect the new design getting offered in a product anytime soon, but I do expect the technology used to trickle down into other things.  Offhand, I'm betting on mobile as the driver.

On my desktop, I could install a third-party card to increase graphics performance.  In a laptop, or my tablet, that's not an option.  Since Intel wants to increase market share in things like the tablet and smartphone spaces, where graphics performance is increasingly an issue,  Intel wants a chip that can be embedded in such platforms that will be competitive with the existing offerings, and I think this effort is part of a move toward that,

 

chrisnfolsom
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Re: price
chrisnfolsom   9/22/2014 3:41:53 PM
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Price is important expecially in closed systems such as tablets...  I am interested though in the power useage, speed and memory - is it scalable? Also, does it play with H.264, H.265, DirectX ?, OPEN GL..  Power is a huge issue (obviously) with gaming/business - always looking for a better solution, but again, if not for AMD, NVIDIA and their pressure we would probably still be at 2GHz and early 2000's technology - I always push for the competition out there.

alex_m1
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price
alex_m1   9/22/2014 2:36:19 PM
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Jon ,

Yes , this looks like an impressive chip. But still , isn't $280 too much to ask for such chip ? or even is there any big demand for strong $280 gpu chips ?

 

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