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Max The Magnificent
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Re: How Mirrors Work
Max The Magnificent   10/1/2014 4:36:28 PM
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@KarlS01: What if I lie down, will that make it up and down?

Try it and see LOL

Speaking of which -- have you tried those Prizm Glasses -- they are actually pretty good for watching TV while laying flat on your back.

KarlS01
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Re: Rotating china plates
KarlS01   10/1/2014 4:30:40 PM
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@ccorbj,  I will do more observation.  As I am not sure there was enouigh time for bubbles to form.  Just tried without potatoes and no immediate rattling.  You did make me wonder if it is similar to a coffee percolator where I suppose the bubbles burst because of steam pressure and force water up the tube.

KarlS01
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Re: How Mirrors Work
KarlS01   10/1/2014 4:20:57 PM
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@Max,  What if I lie down, will that make it up and down?  Seems better than having my eyeballs relocated.

ccorbj
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Re: Rotating china plates
ccorbj   10/1/2014 2:51:30 PM
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@GSKrasle and @Karl - since you started the answer thread on this topic, here's my 2 cents. A bit of a give-away is that the pot will not rattle nearly as violently if you are just boiling water without potatoes. The process is similar to cavitation around a ship's propellor. Vapor bubbles seed (nucleate) on surafces, then grow and eventually collapse. This is what causes damage to propellors in cavitation. In boiling a similar thing happens, but the pan isn't damaged, it just rattles. If there's just water in the pan, bubbles can grow only on the sides and bottom and don't get very big before they collapse at the water's surface, releasing steam. But around potatoes, whose rough surafces add to nucleation, large bubbles can grow and result in more shock when they finally collapse.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: How Mirrors Work
Max The Magnificent   10/1/2014 2:43:38 PM
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@GSKrasle: Why do we say mirrors exchange left and right, instead of top and bottom?

Because we have two eyes that are mounted (presented) in a horizontal plane -- if one of our eyes was located in our forehead and the other on our chin,then we would see things being swapped vertically rather than horizontally.

Next... LOL

 

krisi
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Re: future of spin
krisi   10/1/2014 2:39:57 PM
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This spin entangelment always puzzles me...looks to violate Einstein if the true information can be send faster than speed of light...I am desparately out of depth here ;-)

ccorbj
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Re: future of spin
ccorbj   10/1/2014 2:33:28 PM
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@krisi - good point.Entanglement seems like the best bet. When one spin in an entangled pair is flipped, the other has to respond and can do so at a distance. What I'm not sure about is transmission of information by this method. In theory, the partner spin should respond more or less instantaneously, violating the restriction on the speed of light. The standard response to any violation of this limit always seems to be a lot of hand-waving about no real information being exchanged in such a transition. To save a lot of physics, it certainly seems that we need to accept that restriction, but perhaps there is a way to transfer info between an entangled pair at or below the speed of light, in which case this mechanism could work.

krisi
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Re: future of spin
krisi   10/1/2014 2:15:38 PM
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thank you @ccorbj...interesting news

what I always wonder is the following: you should be able to build spin devices that do computation more efficienctly than current charge based transistors (lots of people working on this)...but about the wires? how do you send the spin information to the next computing element? if you have to convert spin to charge everytime to send voltage/current across that is NOT going to be efficient

ccorbj
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Re: future of spin
ccorbj   10/1/2014 1:43:12 PM
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@krisi - interesting question.  A couple of interesting articles in today's ACM News mention:

* Field-coupled magnets could replace transistors in some circuits (nano-magnetic logic). This is from the technical university of Munich. The method has very high density largely because while the nanomagnets are roughly the same size as transistors, they don't need wires to connect - they couple through magnetic fields. Of course that isn't going to work for cross-chip communication where you would either need to switch back to conventional logic, or have chains of nanomagnets to transmit signals.

* Quantum logic continue to progress. The University of Oxford (my alma mater) announced the first quantum logic operation for an integrated photonic chip. It has a way to go - the current version performs with about 89% fidelity, not something you would want securing financial transactions. But headed in the right direction.

krisi
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future of spin
krisi   10/1/2014 1:15:42 PM
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sounds like "spin" is multi-billion dollar industry already...will it compete with "electron charge" trillion dollar industry in the future?

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