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Power Design the Cognitive Layering Way

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krisi
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Re: Power Consumption
krisi   10/6/2014 1:16:41 PM
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thank u

Boahen and his team have developed Neurogrid, a circuit board consisting of 16 custom-designed "Neurocore" chips. Together these 16 chips can simulate 1 million neurons and billions of synaptic connections. The team designed these chips with power efficiency in mind. Their strategy was to enable certain synapses to share hardware circuits. The result was Neurogrid – a device about the size of an iPad that can simulate orders of magnitude more neurons and synapses than other brain mimics on the power it takes to run a tablet computer.

The National Institutes of Health funded development of this million-neuron prototype with a five-year Pioneer Award. Now Boahen stands ready for the next steps – lowering costs and creating compiler software that would enable engineers and computer scientists with no knowledge of neuroscience to solve problems – such as controlling a humanoid robot – using Neurogrid.

Its speed and low power characteristics make Neurogrid ideal for more than just modeling the human brain. Boahen is working with other Stanford scientists to develop prosthetic limbs for paralyzed people that would be controlled by a Neurocore-like chip.

"Right now, you have to know how the brain works to program one of these," said Boahen, gesturing at the $40,000 prototype board on the desk of his Stanford office. "We want to create a neurocompiler so that you would not need to know anything about synapses and neurons to able to use one of these."

rayhv1
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Re: Power Consumption
rayhv1   10/3/2014 6:48:49 PM
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It is best if you go to the source in order to answer your question. Below is tiltle of article.

 

Stanford Report, April 28, 2014

Stanford bioengineers create circuit board modeled on the human brain



krisi
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Re: Power Consumption
krisi   10/3/2014 5:33:25 PM
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What is the performance of the Stanford chip?

rayhv1
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Re: Power Consumption
rayhv1   10/3/2014 4:45:09 PM
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Stanford has developed a "neromorphic" chip based on neuronal principles.

krisi
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Re: Power Consumption
krisi   10/2/2014 7:11:47 PM
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I have similar thoughts...but need a proof in the pudding, pardon, silicon

rayhv1
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Power Consumption
rayhv1   10/2/2014 5:43:38 PM
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I am a neuroscientist and have always been impressed by biological systems ability to process information with extreme efficiency (25watts verses Megawatts for supercomputers).  Your article had numerous design concepts that beautifully parallel biological information processing architectures found in nature (i.e. the brain).

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