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CC VanDorne
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Re: Brain retardation
CC VanDorne   2/2/2015 10:07:13 AM
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I see more evidence that @prab's observation will shape future (a de-volution of sorts) than I do the one described by vcc0.  These days evo-angelists like them sound more like preachers or polititians than scientists.

Duane Benson
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Re: Call me old fashioned
Duane Benson   1/31/2015 9:45:20 PM
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Yes. Well said! I can still navigate with a map and compass, and I still own a slide rule (though I'm a bit rusty on its use). I do know what Log tables are, and I have them in my old CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics.

I do like to keep up with the new stuff though. I try not to let my kids get too ahead of me with new tech.

David Ashton
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Re: Call me old fashioned
David Ashton   1/31/2015 5:53:14 AM
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@Crusty - well said!!

Crusty1
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Call me old fashioned
Crusty1   1/31/2015 5:26:49 AM
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I can remember when they would not let me use a slide rule in examinations, (just log tables). i can remember when I drove a car without satnav,( just AA route maps). I can remember when I counted cattle with out RFI tags, (just rembered what Daisy looked like while riding a horse around the fields).

I could go on, as in 70 years I have seen a lot of change and used a lot of new technology. Yes I even worked with steam traction engines on the farm.

However I am glad I had the grounding in early technology and primitave schooling, why?

Well when walking in the remote areas of Britain, the communications technology tends to fail and with it all the technical aids I like to have, so a plain Ordance Survey map and a magnetic compass and simple navigational computing skills (Human Brain) allow me to navigate back to technology.

There are hundreds of other technological things I have walking around with me in my brain, that I can use with only limited resources, or when I have no source of cloud information service.

There is great pleasure in keeping alive the old skills that get pushed aside by technology and who knows when it may save your life?

And yes I like modern tech. Just do not loose sight of what built the tech we use.

 

Duane Benson
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Re: Brain retardation
Duane Benson   1/30/2015 8:40:34 PM
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I would agree that it's not the use, but how and why it's used. If the calculator is used so that a person can get back to wasting opportunities sooner, then I'd call it bad. On the other hand, if the calulator is used so the person can get pased the basic math and get to problem solving, creating, adventuring, or discovering, than, it's a very good thing.

Some of the possibilies for augmenting humans are really difficult to wrap my head around, but I would guess that I would still end up feeling the same: why is it done and what is it used for?

RichQ
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Re: Brain retardation
RichQ   1/28/2015 7:19:20 PM
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I agree with binaryJudy that it's not the use of the technology that is the problem. We all have grown dependent on technology for things like our food, water, and sanitation, for instance, a point nicely made in this article. As long as we are training our children to think logically, analyze problems, and work systematically it doesn't really matter if they need a calculator when the job calls for it. Being able to do mental math can be helpful, sure, but necessary? Not when the technology to assist is so inexpensive and readily available.

BinaryJudy
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Re: Brain retardation
BinaryJudy   1/28/2015 6:11:21 PM
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@bk11 and @prabhakar Made me think of the movie Idiocracy, where everyone has become extremely lazy and stupid.

The "Identity Processsing Program of America" computer asks "If you have one bucket that contains 2 gallons and another bucket that contains 7 gallons, how many buckets do you have?"

Not quite the same but I do find myself not even trying to (or even thinking about) memorizing things now that I have Google in my pocket. For the most part, I believe these advances will help humanity. Especially if it improves one's quality of life. If it ever gets to a Deus Ex style dystopian future (video game where you can purchase augments for different parts of the body, some weaponized) then things could become scary.

bk11
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Re: Brain retardation
bk11   1/28/2015 2:59:04 PM
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prabhakar_deosthali hit the nail on the head.  How many have watched a cashier struggle to make change without the aid of a cash register, or fail to comprehend that  a $15 item marked 50% off shouldn't ring up at $10?

junko.yoshida
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Re: Superwoman
junko.yoshida   1/28/2015 11:57:28 AM
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Fantastic story! Thanks for chiming in. Yes, it is a great example of what the technology could do to a courageous man like your mother. May she rest in peace.

boblespam
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Superwoman
boblespam   1/28/2015 3:20:56 AM
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Summer 1986, South of France, my mother lifts off her wheel chair and with the help of an exoskeleton developed by the Pr. Rabishong and his team, she wrote History. The machine is very impressive, it's made of hydraulic motors and a huge computer mimics the steps of a nearby valid person. It was 30 years ago, she made the first (exhausting) steps of a big adventure, it's great to see that's this adventure is still continuing: my mother died last month, she was a role model for me and for many other people who had to face the challenges of life.



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