REGISTER | LOGIN
Breaking News
Blog

Who Says Engineers Don't Think?

Blog
6/15/2015 00:10 AM EDT

 56 comments   post a comment
NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 6   >   >>
David Ashton
User Rank
Author
Re: I can't complain
David Ashton   8/26/2015 9:11:59 PM
NO RATINGS
@SufferingHusband (glad I'm not the only one there.... :-)

When You say "I have had some experience with T100's", you flatter me.  I have used them and fixed some basic faults, but that was nearly 40 years ago.....

One of the few real problems I did fix was the motor brushes going.  I had one fail - just totally dead - and fairly quickly found that the brushes were finished.  Good luck finding some more if that is what is wrong with yours!  But worth trying, they are superb machines and almost totally reliable.  If it is the brushes, or an obvious problem with the motor,  try and find a motor service centre - we still have a few shops here that do rewinding and stuff - and they may be able to help.  On machines this age you may need a bit of cleaning and lubrication as well - just light machine oil should do, and be sparing with it.

Contact me on stn564 (at) yahoo (dot) com (dot) au if you wish.

Cheers / David

 

 

sufferinghusband
User Rank
Rookie
Re: I can't complain
sufferinghusband   8/26/2015 8:21:37 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi David, I am new to this site, and noticed that you had some experience with the Siemens T100's. Been trying to figure out a way to send you a message but not much luck. After years of trying to get my hands on a teletype unit, I got this old girl and she needs some loving. I was an operator not a tech on these things, but familiar enough I hope to get it going. I only really want it as a working display piece at this stage. Any chance of some advice re power to the motor? It is driving me nuts! Cheers

perl_geek
User Rank
Author
Re: I can't complain
perl_geek   7/2/2015 3:50:49 PM
NO RATINGS
Given "Ars longa, vita brevis", at some level we just have to accept that most things do what they say on the tin, without really knowing why or how.

I must admit, though, that I like to know at least a little bit about how the things in my environment work, separately and together, to a couple of degrees of separation.

herbissimus
User Rank
Author
Re: Two cultures
herbissimus   7/1/2015 7:12:03 PM
NO RATINGS
phobic ! fear of math, fear of failure, fear of getting dirty or electrocution, acid burns,toxic fumes.

P.S. i want that guy in the picture on the right to be my dad, please ! 

traneus
User Rank
Author
Credit for writing papers
traneus   7/1/2015 6:59:14 PM
NO RATINGS
My father was a chemistry professor at a liberal-arts college, and later a dean at another liberal-arts college. He taught me that almost anything could be a valid liberal-arts class. To him, liberal arts was about learning to write papers, and everything else was merely subject matter. The liberal-arts academic part is not the content of the class; the student earns liberal-arts academic credit by writing papers about the content of the class.

toddkrein
User Rank
Author
Re: Depends on the Liberal Arts program
toddkrein   6/26/2015 1:41:04 PM
NO RATINGS
Don't confuse the state of our higher education system, nor our bizzare requirement of a four-year degree for everyone, with the value of different disciplines. I've seen plenty of programmers with as little talent as hack novellists. (And those are three different rants.)

Enginnering is *a* way of thinking, along with some rules for application. History, requires a different mode of thinking. Creating fine music a third, and doing basic science a fourth. None of them are inherently "better" than the others, although some may have more perceived "worth" in the market place. Having more tools in your toolbox, however, allows you different ways of approaching the same challange. If all you have is a hammer, everything is a mechanical engineering problem.

MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Author
Re: Depends on the Liberal Arts program
MeasurementBlues   6/26/2015 1:34:01 PM
NO RATINGS
"But what about Communications?  Criminal Justice?  Psychology?  Sociology?"

I know of a certain liberal arts university you have all heard of that teaches Psycology, English Sociology, philosphy but not Journalism or criminal justice. Why, as one professor described it "we are not a trade school. We teach people to think?

But the school now offers degrees in electrical engieering. Go figure.

TonyTib
User Rank
Author
Re: Depends on the Liberal Arts program
TonyTib   6/26/2015 12:41:39 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, a good liberal arts program can teach you how to think (as can science and engineering), and can be quite rigourous -- but I doubt that most American university liberal arts programs are that way.  How many of them now require studying the classics of English and Western literature?  Classical history?  Plato and Aristotle?

There's evidence that most liberal arts majors do not learn how to how write clearly, relate to other people, mediate disputes, know Western civilization, and appreciate classical music from their college experience.

And what programs do we consider liberal arts?  There's English, History, Philosophy, Theology, and such.  But what about Communications?  Criminal Justice?  Psychology?  Sociology?

But getting back to the core topic, yes, in a certain sense the classical liberal arts (literature, music, philosophy, history, etc) are higher than engineering, in that they are good in things themselves, and not means to an end - at least, they should be (there are plenty of books that never should've been written, etc).

toddkrein
User Rank
Author
Re: I can't complain
toddkrein   6/26/2015 12:41:19 PM
NO RATINGS
This is an argument of perceptual bias. We engineers pride ourselves on knowning how everything works, at least the tools we use, and being able to reason out how anything else "of importance" works.

We know how our o-scopes work. Do we really? To what level? We know that it draws a line on a phosphorous coated screen using electrons, deflected by a static electric field.

Do you understand how the windings on the focus toroid work? Do you calibrate for pincushioning before each measurement? How often, then?

Do you undertand the quantum mechanical basis for the glow, or do you just assume it works the way it should? Do you understand the basis for electrolytic dielectric growth, or do you just assume that your caps will work? Do you really understand the Miller effect on the space charge layer, or do you just assume that your transisters will work?

Do you understand the stack rewind required when getting floating point exceptions, or just you just read the displayed web page?

Looking the other direction, why doesn't the radar gun self-calibrate, or at least notify the user when the calibration is suspect? Did the  designer, perhaps, think "Look meathead, don't touch the delicate parts, and don't bother asking how it works. Just use it. Trust me, it works."

toddkrein
User Rank
Author
Re: Liberal arts Insecurity complex
toddkrein   6/26/2015 12:26:14 PM
NO RATINGS
I hate to point it out, but the phrase "less flowery language than liberal arts people" demonstraits quite an unfortunate bias. You can learn a lot about how to frame a concept from lawyers, contextual applicability from reading the SCOTUS opinions, and how people's minds (and sucessfull marketting) really work by listening to TV preachers.

I glad that you were able to find your niche as a communicator rather than a designer. But I think it would be disengenuous to believe that you didn't add to your communication skills when reading well written history texts.

Some of the more enlightened schools, like WPI (where my father went, BTW), understand that liberal arts are vital to molding the best engineering-trained citizens. It merely proves my point. A course on techincal writing is no less a liberal arts class because it's taught in the school of engineering, and I would hazard a guess that it was added to address the sorry comminication skills of the typical engineer. (N.B., I wish I had had the opportunity to take one. I may be the one person who, on his lab reports, found the comment from the TA "Add more fluff.")

Page 1 / 6   >   >>
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed