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NASA Orion Team: More Show & Tell

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steve.taranovich
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Re: Technology for Mars
steve.taranovich   9/28/2015 8:11:50 PM
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@ScribCore---Regarding Terraforming Mars: Terraforming Mars soil is not likely in the near future. Martian soil does not have enough moisture and has none of the good bacteria needed to grow crops properly. Read the book or see the movie "The Martian". NASA told me that they definitely gave their technical support to the making of the movie and one of the technical realities is that today, astronauts on the International Space Station have an abundance of food delivered to them by cargo resupply vehicles, including some from commercial industries. On Mars, humans would not be able to rely on resupply missions from Earth – even with express delivery they would take at least nine months. For humans to survive on Mars, they will need a continuous source of food. They will need to grow crops. All moisture would be recycled and oxygen should be abundant---the need to scrub CO2 is the challenge that will be solved by 2030 or before.

The most interesting things I find intriguing about landing and setting up a colony on Mars are: Possible mining operations, having a base for deep space exploration, one way trips to Mars to live there and just the detailed exploration of the planet's mountains/caves, beneath the surface exploration and the running water recently found and then Solar energy development and Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs).

As for simulating Earth's gravity on Mars, maybe they will start in the "habitat" and grow the habitats larger and larger in time and work on some sort of gravity system. We are not close to any technology that I know of right now, but in time.....

During the 9 month flight, the only issues I see are radiation and solar activity causing radiation—NASA has this covered with their storage areas on Orion that are well shielded. Astronauts will climb into these small areas until the problem subsides. As for long-term habitation, the International Space Station is studying that but longer term than a year or so in a relatively small, enclosed space also has psychological impacts which need to be addressed.

ScribCore
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Technology for Mars
ScribCore   9/28/2015 6:02:43 PM
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Hi Steve,

Have you heard of any plans to terraform on Mars during habitation?

What other possible items on the agenda do you find most interesting?

Also, for long-term habitation have mass suits, or other concepts, been designed to simulate Earth's gravity on Mars?

Do you see any other issues with a 9-month flight, followed by long-term habitation?

 

TIA

 

steve.taranovich
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Re: NASA should be crowdfunded
steve.taranovich   9/28/2015 1:14:48 PM
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@perl_geek Your point is well taken----There is hope with Private industry like Space-X and others as long as they focus upon the right goals and not people paying a million $$$$ to go to Mars one way or a joy ride into space.

NASA has a bare-bones budget as compared with times past and they are using it creatively and effectively and keeping human safety at the forefront. I believe they need to stay in the business of innovation for space travel--they have some of the brightest minds in the industry doing excellent research there with so many great by-products going to those who need help on Earth---for free. 

perl_geek
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NASA should be crowdfunded
perl_geek   9/28/2015 1:06:16 PM
I'm thoroughly in favour of research in general, and space exploration in particular, but there's a moral issue.  Should it be financed by money raised at gunpoint, (taxes), or by voluntary contributions? Of course, those feeding at the public trough would prefer that such heresies not be uttered.

Taxpayer-funded research, like NACA's, may be justified on the grounds that open studies preclude wasteful duplication of proprietary industrial studies, and will essentially return enough general welfare to pay for themselves.

At one point, there wasn't much choice, beyond industrial sponsorship, but the rise of crowd-funding has opened the field up again.  (Lest anyone think that the amounts involved are too large, compare NASA's annual budget ro all sorts of trivial line items in the economy.)

steve.taranovich
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Re: Space...
steve.taranovich   9/28/2015 12:09:30 PM
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I agree @ScribCore. The question of origen cannot be solely answered by going to Mars. The enedeavor to go to Mars and beyond, of course, is not the main focus of space travel. Man is ever seeking his origen and purpose here on this planet. As a Christian, I have certain faith beliefs as to my origen as do so many other faiths.

That said, space travel is one way of understanding the science of our evolution. How the universe (and man) came about via scientific and "natural" causes. If our faith and beliefs in God (or whomever we call this "higher power") are well founded, then science should confirm our faith beliefs.

For those who do not believe in a higher power, I also respect their beliefs. I only ask that they please believe that I believe.

ScribCore
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Space...
ScribCore   9/28/2015 9:51:57 AM
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I notice that your article includes space exploration as a means to determine the origin of mankind. While I'm in favor of making exciting discoveries in the physcial sciences, I don't think we need to go to Mars to answer the question of origin.

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