REGISTER | LOGIN
Breaking News
Blog

Open Source: Not Pragmatic After All?

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
TonyTib
User Rank
Author
Re: Self-reliance - and efficiency
TonyTib   3/2/2017 8:43:10 PM
NO RATINGS
I think there's also a difference in capability and efficiency -- but those take time to learn, and in the cloud age & smart phone age, all that seems to matter is instant convenience, not ergonomics, and ability to get real work done.

When I've had to help my kids with Google Docs, I haven't been impressed.  OTOH, if you really want to use, say, LO Writer, it takes some learning and planning, but the results are worth it for non-trivial documents.  (Same for Excel -- I've seen some people do amazing interactive analysis with Excel)

elizabethsimon
User Rank
Author
Re: Self-reliance
elizabethsimon   3/2/2017 7:02:03 PM
NO RATINGS
@ perl_geek

Not to mention that having local files and applications allows you to work or do presentations in places with no internet access.

An event I went to last year was at a location with no internet and really marginal cell service, yet they had multiple presentations.

HankWalker
User Rank
Author
Re: Self-reliance
HankWalker   3/2/2017 6:04:25 PM
NO RATINGS
Clouds have fundamental security issues, in that if your VM is sharing memory hierarchy with another VM, there can be information leakage to the other VM. But they surely win on security compared to the typical organization security. Windows XP is still >8% of the OS market! In terms of availability, EC2 has an SLA of 99.95% S3 has an SLA of 99.9%. Most internal facilities I know have more tha 9 hours per year of downtime, when maintenance is included. And how timely is your software patching? Remember that the story from the deep snow (Brian Dipert) was talking about problems keeping software up-to-date. And can your systems handle peak loads, especially if you have a very bursty load?

 

perl_geek
User Rank
Author
Self-reliance
perl_geek   3/2/2017 1:29:41 PM
NO RATINGS
After the recent snafu at Amazon, I wonder how many people are re-assessing the attractions of "cloud" applications. If you are running a lot of hardware, I suppose the economics might be attractive, but at the modest price of machines today, knowing exactly where your material is, and having access to it under control seems like cheap insurance.

TonyTib
User Rank
Author
Re: GSuite Killed It
TonyTib   3/2/2017 12:42:51 PM
NO RATINGS
Well, there's enough LibreOffice fans to keep it improving -- maybe it's niche, but LO Writer can do things like handle 200+ page technical manuals (better than Word, too).  I don't think Google Docs comes close.

HankWalker
User Rank
Author
GSuite Killed It
HankWalker   3/2/2017 12:05:10 PM
NO RATINGS
As was implied in the other comment, GSuite (Google Apps) and other free/free-ish cloud based tools killed the reason for OpenOffice. The only people I have met in recent years who use it are UNIX users who want a local office suite. That is a pretty limited population.

 

jamestate
User Rank
Freelancer
It's just been replaced with LibreOffice
jamestate   2/26/2017 3:34:15 AM
NO RATINGS
Fact is when Oracle gave the suite to ASF they already knew the LibreOffice fork was winning over OpenOffice. That's why they gave it away so easily to begin with. OpenOffice, back when it was at Oracle, basically ignored 3rd party patches that's why the fork happened to begin with. LibreOffice has enough developers. Why aren't there even more developers? Because it's a large complicated codebase with a high barrier of entry for beginners.

As for Thunderbird, a large amount of people have switched to web-based e-mail platforms, so its hardly surprising it doesn't have nearly as much support anymore.

 

Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed