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My Arduino Robot Bites the Dust! Oh, the Horror…
10/25/2013

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The robot base I was going to use before my hopes were so cruelly crushed.
The robot base I was going to use before my hopes were so cruelly crushed.

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Max The Magnificent
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Re: What does "Torque: 0.78Kg-cm (rated load)" mean?
Max The Magnificent   10/25/2013 4:47:47 PM
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@aeroengineer: Also to note you may need more power to get up a bump in the road and such

I'm primarily going to have it scurrying aroudn the hardwood floors in our house -- no bumps or anything like that to worry about

Caleb Kraft
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Re: What does "Torque: 0.78Kg-cm (rated load)" mean?
Caleb Kraft   10/25/2013 4:32:44 PM
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now I'm curious! I want to know what you guys are working on!

DrFPGA
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Re: What does "Torque: 0.78Kg-cm (rated load)" mean?
DrFPGA   10/25/2013 4:22:55 PM
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From no happy dance to school girl squeal in about 30 seconds. You are one mercurial guy max.

Garcia-Lasheras
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Re: Motors
Garcia-Lasheras   10/25/2013 4:11:58 PM
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Unfortunately, I have not any background on motors dynamics, and torque specs are like black magic for me :-(

Having said this, thank you very much for the detail photo of the wheels. When I read your previous blog, I was wondering how the robot was going to deal with the "dragging" force of the remaining perpendicular wheel when moving in a straight line. Now the mechanism is crystal clear!!

Aeroengineer
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Re: What does "Torque: 0.78Kg-cm (rated load)" mean?
Aeroengineer   10/25/2013 3:59:19 PM
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Also to note you may need more power to get up a bump in the road and such.  As to your motors, and torque in general.  Torque is a simple force times a distance.  So if you had a wheel that had a diameter that was ø1" and it took 2lbs of force to get it going, then you would need a motor with 2in*lbs of torque (sometimes also written as lbs*in).  As to which motor is stronger, you will just need to do the unit conversions (actually cancel out the appropriate number of zeros) to get to N*m (Newton*meters).

Max The Magnificent
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Re: What does "Torque: 0.78Kg-cm (rated load)" mean?
Max The Magnificent   10/25/2013 3:50:03 PM
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@TonyTib: Next questions, how are you going to read the quadrature encoder?

Duane Benson is working on something that is so exciting it makes me want to squeal like a school girl. Duane and I will be writing about thsi in the not-so-distant future. Suffice it to say that it can be used to address this issue.

TonyTib
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Re: What does "Torque: 0.78Kg-cm (rated load)" mean?
TonyTib   10/25/2013 3:46:20 PM
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That encoder is just a US Digital E4P with the proper sizing for the motor's shaft.  Another option if you need higher resolution is CUI's AMT encoders, which are <$30 at Digikey.  With encoders, you have to match shaft size, mounting holes (or sticky tape), output format (quadrature / sin-cos / serial, single ended / differential, etc), and speed (which won't be an issue in your case).  Most (all?) E4Ps are single ended quadrature output.

Next questions, how are you going to read the quadrature encoder?  If you use interrupts, you'll be severely limited in speed.  Another approach is to convert quadrature to up/down and connect to a counter.  Also, there might be encoder input shields available.  (Side note: another reason why the BeagleBone is so nice, it's got three quadrature encoder inputs built in)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Motors
Max The Magnificent   10/25/2013 3:44:20 PM
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@aeroengineer: What I really want is for someone to say "This motor is just what you need" ... failing that, your starting point is just what I need :-)

Aeroengineer
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Motors
Aeroengineer   10/25/2013 3:22:20 PM
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While bowties are cool, I prefer more the pinstripe suit and a long overcoat.  That aside to things of lesser importance, motors.  DC electric motors are not that bad if you can get a few numbers out of them.  The two main numbers that you will need are the Stall Torque and the No Load Speed.  From there I plot that data on a chart with RPM on the x axis and torque on the y axis.  The line between these two points represents the operating capacity of the motor.  I generally try and keep the motor operating under 30% of max torque for continuous duty operations with brief moments in the 50% torque range.  This will keep the motors happy.  You can go higher if you have active cooling on the motor.  With this in hand, you will then need to determine the amount of torque that is needed on each wheel.  Because you are going to loose some efficiency in each wheel (most likely each of these wheels will be around 50% efficient in transmitting torque to the ground).  This should give you some general sizing parameters.  You would have to do some hand cranks assuming an acceleration rate how much torque would be needed to be delivered to the wheels, but this should give you a starting point.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: What does "Torque: 0.78Kg-cm (rated load)" mean?
Max The Magnificent   10/25/2013 3:16:39 PM
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Take a look at this page. This was the motor I was originally going to get (but it doesn't have the shaft encoder).

This is rated at 78.4mN.m -- is that bigger / better / badder than 0.78Kg-cm?

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