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Automakers Sharing Data? When Cars Fly

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Victor.Lew
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A primer to explain the background would enhance
Victor.Lew   1/16/2017 11:49:55 AM
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Regarding "Automakers Sharing Data", I prefer to first be presented a primer, as a backgrounder, of the extensive efforts of the mapping, navigation, and automotive industry efforts relative to any culmination of a substantial and possibily monolthic navigation and mapping data sharing model presented in this article.

Years of major efforts to bring together many parties, from past efforts of the AdaptIVe consortium, ERTICO-ITS Europe, Vehicle and Road Automation (VRA) Group, SENSORIS Innovation Platform, Navigation Data Standard (NDS) Association, Open Autodrive Consortia, ADASIS Forum, up to the present efforts from entities such as OpenStreetMap, Google Maps, or Dynamic Map Development Co. (SIP-adus in Japan) or HERE or TomTom, would provide evidence that any outsider not directly involved in these discussions and negotiations simply cannot project any reasonable assessment of the depth, details or timing of such monolithic agreements.

Observing that even as we speak the telecommunications industry, the cloud providers, the big data analytics leadership, and other supporting providers are signing contracts for committing substantial resources to the infrastructure required to faciltate this monolithic model, even before the final announcement is consummated, supports an analysis that needs much elaboration and underpinning.

An announcement of a master data sharing plan for mapping could easily be presented to the marketplace tomorrow, and this article is then essentially void of any real analysis or accuracy, or merits.  

I am miffed why those who reside in California seem to be touted as the leading experts in the Auto Industry.

Les_Slater
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Driving policy must be an industry standard
Les_Slater   1/16/2017 11:59:01 AM
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There is a regulatory issue also, whatever autonomy these vehicles will have will be very dependent on federal, state and local policy. A vehicle that may be quite capable of driving itself might find its owner fined, or even jailed if it excercizes that capability without the consent and regulatory requirements of the jurisdiction.

Not only will industry standards be necessary, but will have to be approved by government agencies. It would make sense for at least part of the infrastructure to be publically built and operations publically funded.

It seems to me that crowdsourcing road data might have advantages, but disadvantages too. Stationary cameras and other roadside sensors could be more robust. In either case though, the robustness and timeliness would be of the utmost importance.

These vehicles could be totally autonomous, not requiring a local infrastructure separate from the vehicles themselves. It would take making these vehicles part of a mesh network. Of course, here (no capital H), would definitely require industry standards.

There is a regulatory issue also, whatever autonomy these vehicles will have will be very dependent on federal, state and local policy. A vehicle that may be quite capable of driving itself might find its owner fined, or even jailed if it excercizes that capability without the consent and regulatory requirements of the jurisdiction.

Not only will industry standards be necessary, but will have to be approved by government agencies. It would make sense for at least part of the infrastructure to be publically built and operations publically funded.

It seems to me that crowdsourcing road data might have advantages, but disadvantages too. Stationary cameras and other roadside sensors could be more robust. In either case though, the robustness and timeliness would be of the utmost importance.

These vehicles could be totally autonomous, not requiring a local infrastructure separate from the vehicles themselves. I would take making these vehicles part of a mesh network. Of course, here (no capital H), would definitely require industry standards.

Doug_S
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Re: Driving policy must be an industry standard
Doug_S   1/16/2017 1:25:28 PM
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Why would the OWNER be fined or jailed? It should be up to the car company that writes/maintains the software to insure it can only operate autonomously in areas where it is legal to do so. In areas where the legal status isn't known for sure, the vehicle should refuse to operate autonomously.

Perhaps it might include some method to override that in an emergency (i.e. you are injured and need to get to a hospital) but only in cases where the owner overrides the vehicle's restrictions should the owner be liable.

Making the owner criminally liable for what an autonomous vehicle does is the fastest way to insure they never take off. That would be like putting you in jail because you bought some consumer product that unbeknownst to you leaked RF on restricted bands.

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