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Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business

Two or three sticking points
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garydpdx
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re: Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business
garydpdx   7/15/2012 3:15:47 PM
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GF USA could set up a subsidiary that meets Pentagon criteria for security.

KB3001
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re: Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business
KB3001   7/15/2012 8:04:54 PM
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It would still be technically owned by ATIC, unless they force ATIC to spin it out, in which case they can't rely on ATIC's money anymore. Not an easy decision...

rick merritt
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re: Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business
rick merritt   7/16/2012 3:30:31 AM
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I agree that such a deal could face too many political hurdles to be viable given the US gov't investments in New York and IBM's military business, but IBM might surprise us and make the rumors come true.

rick merritt
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re: Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business
rick merritt   7/16/2012 2:30:41 PM
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Also, IBM's proprietary Power and zSeries processors are intimately tied to its server business. If it sold its fabs it would at least have to structure a close foundry relationship like AMD/Glofo.

chipmonk0
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re: Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business
chipmonk0   7/16/2012 3:45:07 PM
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Just more idle speculation from poseurs in a country ( ARM included ) with not much skin or credibility in semiconductor technology or business. For the last 10 years or so IBM's tactic of amortizing its semiconductor R&D expenses by licensing its process technology first to AMD and then newbies like Samsung & the Foundries that cater to ARM licensees has been a pain in the neck for Intel. If IBM was really in the market to cash out of its semiconductor activity and its still considerable R&D and IP goodies then Intel would probably outbid Abu Dhabi to acquire it. Would be more effective than even finFET and the US Govt. would be happy to see IBM technology stay within the US ( Intel still builds its leading Fabs in the US in order to slow down IP theft ).

ChrisGar
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re: Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business
ChrisGar   7/16/2012 10:36:07 PM
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It is odd the author doesn't know that IBM is a leading provider of ASICs in the industry -- and was the lead producer of all three Game Processors.

HillolSarkar
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re: Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business
HillolSarkar   7/17/2012 12:34:39 AM
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IBM will never sell Chip business 100%. It is our National interest. Which country we can trust. These business people can say anything but we have $1T defense budget. Do you think we should sell DoD because it is not profitable? Oracle will not buy Sun. Why Sun? Ask these questions.

Peter Clarke
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re: Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business
Peter Clarke   7/17/2012 11:45:57 AM
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I do know that IBM is a foundry supplier of chips. But it is in fact relatively small lying just behind TowerJazz in a 2011 ranking. As to its role producing processors for games consoles I could argue that is largely historical and will diminish going forward.

Peter Clarke
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re: Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business
Peter Clarke   7/17/2012 11:47:22 AM
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I also heard people saying that IBM would not sell its PC business overseas. But they did.

ChrisGar
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re: Will GlobalFoundries buy IBM chip business
ChrisGar   7/17/2012 12:30:25 PM
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But the article says: "IBM does not sell chips on the open market ..." In Y2011 rankings, IBM sold $545M worth of semiconductors to the open market.

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