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Massacre at IBM, a case study

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8/9/2012 04:08 PM EDT

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Turkman
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re: Massacre at IBM, a case study
Turkman   8/12/2012 1:41:21 AM
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Agreed. Tasteless title and shameless commercial. The case study is somewhat interesting but the only thing new in the approach seems to be the name (TM!).

I_B_GREEN
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re: Massacre at IBM, a case study
I_B_GREEN   8/12/2012 9:04:04 PM
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These two managers should be offlined. Two years in the goulog and still not listening 18 month fix program ignored the real problem or out it off th "phase2" If it aint cooked into phase 1 then the whole code gets jacked to add it. Fear of bad vibes wit ones bosses, passing on tough messages fources one to ignore the customer imperiling the companies future, with the upside of a few more years of employment for the managers.

elPresidente
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re: Massacre at IBM, a case study
elPresidente   8/13/2012 2:24:58 AM
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"offlined"? WTF? Does that mean they can come online when someone pushes the right buttons? FIRED. Not "offlined". But they never do get fired or laid off, since they are the ones who pick the winners in a layoff (winners because they no longer will be working for idiots)...they do get offlined, don't they, then go online to screw up a completely unrelated position they get onlined into?

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