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Patent system on trial in Apple, Samsung case

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DMcCunney
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re: Patent system on trial in Apple, Samsung case
DMcCunney   8/21/2012 9:12:59 PM
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In my case, a Tapwave Zodiac 2. The Zodiac was a Palm OS device intended to be a combo PDA and handheld games machine. So it had things like as ATI video chip with 2D accelerations and 8MB video RAM driving a 320x480 screen, Yamaha stereo with stereo speakers on device, 200MB of RAM, and two SD card slots, one of which was SDIO. You could plug a wifi SD card into it and go online, and several browsers existed for the device. Tapwave went belly up in 2005, but I have three Zodiacs and still use one regularly, mostly as an ebook viewer.

Sheetal.Pandey
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re: Patent system on trial in Apple, Samsung case
Sheetal.Pandey   8/22/2012 7:57:11 AM
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This question always came to my mind. Patents can be filed in wide domains and technologies. Does patent granting organizations have the manpower and expertise to do justice to the examination. I guess in the coming era patent related jobs are going to create a revolution.

pinhead1
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Rookie
re: Patent system on trial in Apple, Samsung case
pinhead1   8/23/2012 12:58:01 AM
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How do you define "put into use", though? Plus, a lot of industries have pretty long horizons from research to selling a product. For example, I know that companies have been spending real money on FinFETs for a good 7 years, and only just recently have you been able to buy a product with them in it. So all of that work should be in the public domain?

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