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CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter

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Robotics Developer
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re: CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter
Robotics Developer   1/7/2013 6:34:53 PM
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BD85, I agree with you. The main drivers for acceptance are Price and basic support (ie bandwidth). HDTV is really nice to watch if HD is available for your viewing options, I remember the first time I saw a football game in HD. Wow! The blades of grass were clearly visible. The picture was really nice, but having a larger screen also helped drive HDTVs. The addition of LCD based "flat" TVs really helped drive the size and the "need/desire" for HDTV.

Bert22306
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re: CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter
Bert22306   1/7/2013 7:24:05 PM
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"The majority of HDTV viewers still watch mostly non-HD content on their flat panels, even though so much of it is available. Many can't even tell the difference. The only time they might make the effort to get HD is in live sports and movies." This is what we always heard when HDTV was just starting out. No one cares. Analog TV is just fine. Fact is, though, that if people went back to their old CRTs and analog TV now, they would be surprised at how poor the image is. And another point is, these same people rave about "retinal displays" on their iToys. Even though the screen in tiny. I think the problem is that the average joe probably doesn't analyze what he likes and dislikes very well. It has to be shown to him, before he gets it.

old account Frank Eory
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re: CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter
old account Frank Eory   1/7/2013 8:06:42 PM
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Good points Bert. We both remember very well those days in the late 90s when people questioned why anyone would need the resolution of HDTV and whether the average consumer would even notice or care. Well it turned out that they do notice and they do care, even if they aren't quite sure what it is they are noticing and what makes them like it better. I find it difficult to believe that it is still true that the majority of HDTV viewers are still watching mostly non-HD content. If so, are they watching only DVDs? Since the shutdown of analog TV broadcasting, the only significant remaining sources of non-HD content are cable TV, DVDs, and your old VHS tapes...if you still have a working VCR from last century.

chanj0
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re: CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter
chanj0   1/7/2013 8:11:15 PM
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Human eyes and brain are every interesting. With the 2 resolutions - 720 and 1080 - of current HDTV, most of us can't tell the difference of quality unless there is a side by side comparing. There is no doubt the higher the better. We have to remember what we typically watch in most days - News and possibly TV shows. Do I really care the resolution with these contents? I can actually live with SDTV and even radio with regard to news. Last but not least, the TV broadcasters have to buy new equipments which was one of the key factors for HDTV to wait for 10+ years. Time will change everything. I have no doubt that there will be better resolution 10 years from now regardless of the screen size. The TV market just doesn't seem to be ready today. On the other hands, what if digital content is delivered to cinema for any movie title?

Bert22306
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re: CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter
Bert22306   1/7/2013 9:52:01 PM
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You make interesting points, but you know what? Even the news is a lot better when it's transmitted in HD and wide screen. In my home TV market, I remember when the first local station made the switch to wide screen and HD. It looked superb. And soon after that, all the other stations followed. Same goes with voice programs on the radio. They are far more enjoyable over good FM or digital radio, than over AM radio barely capable of reproducing 3500 Hz (in most AM receivers). Also, what the eye-brain system can truly perceive is not obvious. A first approximation is something like 1 to 1.5 arc-minutes of resolution, which is what drives HDTV to 720 and 1080 lines. But that's only an approximation. The eyes can also focus in on detail in strange ways. Retinal displays are much smaller that HDTV screens, and yet have higher pixel count (2560 X 1600 compared with 1920 X 1080 for the highest HDTV pixel count, or 1280 X 720).

old account Frank Eory
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re: CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter
old account Frank Eory   1/7/2013 11:15:45 PM
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chanj said "Time will change everything. I have no doubt that there will be better resolution 10 years from now regardless of the screen size. The TV market just doesn't seem to be ready today." This is exactly the point, and exactly the same was true 12+ years ago when the first HDTV broadcasts in the U.S. began and there were hardly any HDTV receivers or displays out there to receive them. 4K video cameras are being used today. Content will lead the way and then the affordable 4K displays will follow -- exactly as happened during the transition from SDTV to HDTV over the last decade.

any1
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re: CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter
any1   1/8/2013 2:32:52 PM
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This will be interesting to watch. I believe that the cost of UHDTV displays could drop rapidly over the next couple of years. If that happens adoption will be relatively quick. Now we just need to marry UHDTV AND OLED technologies in the same display.

dilbertclone
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re: CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter
dilbertclone   1/8/2013 2:51:08 PM
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In my home marked, the local news station fired a female anchor after the switch to HD. Lawsuits ensued, but of course there's no proof of a "termination for not aging well in HD".

Video_Production_Bristol
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re: CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter
Video_Production_Bristol   1/8/2013 5:28:52 PM
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"Ambarella, Inc., predicted that 4K content materials may become first available on the Internet" Considering a lot of people still struggle to get sufficient bandwidth to stream video content online I think it's going to be a long time before the masses can deal with even 4K file downloads for home viewing. The first 4K movie for download was 160gb, would hate to see how big the first Ultra HDTV releases are going to be, but they'll sure be hogging your broadband for a fair few days, even on the fastest connections.

cdosrun
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re: CES: Three reasons why Ultra HDTV is a non-starter
cdosrun   1/8/2013 6:25:01 PM
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I loved reading this article. Very well written even though I don't entirely agree with it's premise. Like all technology price will come down. Upconversion will help the lack of content issue. And as you said, manufacturers need high end technology to improve their margins. 4K won't be for everyone but I think it will eventually be cheap enough to go mainstream for home theater enthusiasts.

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